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    #1

    saw him, having crossed the street Vs. saw him having crossed the street

    Dear English teacher:
    I would like to know the difference between sentence A and sentence B below:


    A.) “I saw him, having crossed the street”.
    B.) “I saw him having crossed the street”.
    My understanding is that A) refers to “I”, the subject of the sentence and B) to “him”, the object of the sentence.
    Am I right?
    Thanks

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    #2

    Re: saw him, having crossed the street Vs. saw him having crossed the street

    Quote Originally Posted by High on grammar View Post
    Dear English teacher:
    I would like to know the difference between sentence A and sentence B below:


    A.) “I saw him, having crossed the street”.
    B.) “I saw him having crossed the street”.
    My understanding is that A) refers to “I”, the subject of the sentence and B) to “him”, the object of the sentence.
    Am I right?
    Thanks
    'Yes' regarding (A), but 'no' regarding (B), which is nonsense. (---> either saw him cross or saw him crossing...)

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: saw him, having crossed the street Vs. saw him having crossed the street

    Quote Originally Posted by High on grammar View Post
    A.) “I saw him, having crossed the street”.
    Even this is rather unnatural. We'd be more likely to say, "Having crossed the street, I saw him
    Last edited by 5jj; 03-Dec-2012 at 14:17. Reason: typo

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    #4

    Re: saw him, having crossed the street Vs. saw him having crossed the street

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Even this is rather unnatural. We'd be more likely to say, "Having crossed the street, I saw him
    Here are a few examples I found on the Internet:

    I saw the dog having been brought by Bregans. Perfect Passive Singular

    (the dog had been brought by Bregans before I saw it)




    Mr. Elwood told the court the guinea pig had been discovered having been killed by a fall

    They saw the victim having been brought downby the appellants.

    If a person is found having been murdered by police officer and there is nobody to tell who murdered him, then would the police officer not get the FIR recorded simply because there was no one to say that, that man has been murdered?
    Minorities and police in India - Page 197

  2. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: saw him, having crossed the street Vs. saw him having crossed the street

    Quote Originally Posted by High on grammar View Post
    Here are a few examples I found on the Internet:

    I saw the dog having been brought by Bregans. Perfect Passive Singular

    (the dog had been brought by Bregans before I saw it)




    Mr. Elwood told the court the guinea pig had been discovered having been killed by a fall

    They saw the victim having been brought downby the appellants.

    If a person is found having been murdered by police officer and there is nobody to tell who murdered him, then would the police officer not get the FIR recorded simply because there was no one to say that, that man has been murdered?
    Minorities and police in India - Page 197
    None of these examples are good English.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

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    #6

    Re: saw him, having crossed the street Vs. saw him having crossed the street

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Even this is rather unnatural. We'd be more likely to say, "Having crossed the street, I saw him
    Although that has the same ambiguity as the original, in that I have no idea which person crossed the street.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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