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  1. #1
    anhnha's Avatar
    anhnha is online now Member
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    Default There are twelve including the children.

    Hi all,
    I want to parse the sentence bellow:
    There are twelve including the children.
    Here is what I think but I am not sure. Hope anyone can help me.
    twelve: subject (twelve)
    are : linking verb
    including: adjective
    the: determiner(or adjective)
    children: objective
    But how about "there"? Is it adverb?
    Can I write the sentence as follows:
    Twelve are there including the children.
    OR
    Twelve there are including the children.
    Thank you.

  2. #2
    Katherine99 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: There are twelve including the children.

    Hi Anhnha,

    I think the sentence is parsed as follows:

    There are twelve including the children.

    There-expletive (pronoun)
    are-intransitive verb
    twelve-subject (noun)
    including the children-adverb modifier (prepositional phrase)
    including-preposition
    children-object of preposition
    the-adjective modifier

    I don't think the other two examples are valid sentences. Can anyone else confirm this.

  3. #3
    anhnha's Avatar
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    Default Re: There are twelve including the children.

    Thank you Katherine99,
    I think you are right but there are some part I am not sure. I am confused about "there". How can I know if it is adverb or pronoun?
    including the children-adverb modifier (prepositional phrase)
    Could you tell me what part of sentence the adverb modifier refer to? I think it modify the whole sentence, right?
    Is it possible that "
    including the children" an adjective phrase that modify the noun "twelve"?

  4. #4
    philo2009 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: There are twelve including the children.

    I think you’ll find that a more standard parsing (i.e. sorting words into their most basic grammatical categories) is as follows:

    There: existential ADVERB
    are: finite VERB
    twelve: determinative ADJECTIVE (relating to implied noun “people”)
    including: VERB (participle)
    the: definite ARTICLE (determiner)
    children: plural NOUN

    In terms of phrasal/clausal analysis, the subject is the NP ‘twelve (people)’ and ‘including the children’ is a participle phrase consisting of a head (‘including’, present, a.k.a. active, participle of the verb ‘include’) governing NP ‘the children’ as object, the whole adjectivally post-modifying the subject NP.

  5. #5
    anhnha's Avatar
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    Default Re: There are twelve including the children.

    Thank you, Philo, for your thoughtful answer.
    I like your parsing. It is very clear.
    But I still have a problem, could you help me another again?
    In terms of phrasal/clausal analysis, the subject is the NP ‘twelve (people)’ and ‘including the children’ is a participle phrase consisting of a head (‘including’, present, a.k.a. active, participle of the verb ‘include’) governing NP ‘the children’ as object, the whole adjectivally post-modifying the subject NP.
    If I change the original sentence into the sentence bellow:
    There were twelve including the children.
    In this case, can I use "including"? And is "including" present participle here?

  6. #6
    Katherine99 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: There are twelve including the children.

    Hi Anhnha,

    I am sorry for the incorrect analysis of your sentence, but I am still learning. Here is a diagram of it.
    Click image for larger version. 

Name:	ESL2.jpg 
Views:	4 
Size:	5.2 KB 
ID:	1457

  7. #7
    Katherine99 is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: There are twelve including the children.

    Hi Philo,

    Are you saying to first identify each word with the part of speech it belongs to, and then write a commentary on how they function in the clause?

  8. #8
    hela is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: There are twelve including the children.

    Hello Philo2009,

    Is this a complete sentence ? Shouldn't a subject be added to become a sentence?

  9. #9
    philo2009 is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: There are twelve including the children.

    Quote Originally Posted by anhnha View Post
    Thank you, Philo, for your thoughtful answer.
    I like your parsing. It is very clear.
    But I still have a problem, could you help me another again?

    If I change the original sentence into the sentence bellow:
    There were twelve including the children.
    In this case, can I use "including"? And is "including" present participle here?
    Changing the tense affects the parsing not one whit!

    (By the way, you need a comma before 'including'.)

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