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  1. #1
    Odessa Dawn's Avatar
    Odessa Dawn is offline Senior Member
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    Default "...their English is up to standard"



    Overseas spouses (from outside the European Economic Area) wanting to move to the UK to join British partners now have to pass a number of approved tests to show their English is up to standard.

    "We're asking people to get to a level where you can do relatively straightforward social interaction, a telephone call with somebody, speak to someone in a shop.

    More: BBC News - Does migrants' English test split families?

    Can the underlined part in the second text be suitable definition for the underlined part in the first text because dictionary says that up to standard is synonym for "fit for purpose?"


  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: "...their English is up to standard"

    Yes.

  3. #3
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "...their English is up to standard"

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post


    Overseas spouses (from outside the European Economic Area) wanting to move to the UK to join British partners now have to pass a number of approved tests to show their English is up to standard.

    "We're asking people to get to a level where you can do relatively straightforward social interaction, a telephone call with somebody, speak to someone in a shop.

    More: BBC News - Does migrants' English test split families?

    Can the underlined part in the second text be suitable definition for the underlined part in the first text because dictionary says that up to standard is synonym for "fit for purpose?"

    "to get to a level where you can do relatively straightforward social interaction,"
    If this is written by an authority that is testing people's English, it's not very satisfactory (to put it mildly). We don't "do interaction".

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