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Thread: "Hinglish"

  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #1

    "Hinglish"




    English or Hinglish - which will India choose?

    And some examples of Hindi-cum-English:

    • Dial kiya gaya number abhi vyast hai The number you've dialled is currently busy
    • Kripya prateeksha karen, aap queue mein hain Please wait, you are in a queue


    More: BBC News - English or Hinglish - which will India choose?

    According to English Cambridge Dictionary, the preposition "-cum-" means "
    a person or thing does two things." Question: Does the term Hinglish mean Hindi-cum-English?

  2. david11's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "Hinglish"

    Not a teacher.

    I am not sure whether such term exists or not. However, In my place(though I am in India, I don't speak Hindi. As the author rightly pointer out, my state's language is different), People who don't speak English properly and mix Tamil(my mother tongue)with it, are usually referred as people speaking tanglish. I think the word tanglish would have evolved from "Tamil+English". It is a kind of mock if you say "he speaks tanglish". It is just to mean that he doesn't speak english properly. I guess the word "Hinglish" would also be meant in the same way.

    (I don't know whether terms like this exist in other non-English-native countries. The reason why such terms are used in India may be because of the fact that English is considered as an indicator of one's knowledge. Speaking english is considered as kind as elitism here. I know a lot of parents who want to join their kids to School, have the first priority that their kid should speak English fluently. However knowledgeable a person may be, lack of fluency in English is always regarded as great deficient to him. I presume that's why those terms are used here )

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    #3

    Re: "Hinglish"

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post



    English or Hinglish - which will India choose?

    And some examples of Hindi-cum-English:

    • Dial kiya gaya number abhi vyast hai The number you've dialled is currently busy
    • Kripya prateeksha karen, aap queue mein hain Please wait, you are in a queue


    More: BBC News - English or Hinglish - which will India choose?

    According to English Cambridge Dictionary, the preposition "-cum-" means "
    a person or thing does two things." Question: Does the term Hinglish mean Hindi-cum-English?
    Cum | Define Cum at Dictionary.com

    Maybe you need a better dictionary? "Cum" is Latin for "with." Its use in English means basically the same.

    "Spanglish" is a commonly understood term here, certainly in areas with a high proportion of Spanish-speaking people. It's not a derogatory term, just an indication that there is some blending of the languages.

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    #4

    Re: "Hinglish"

    Here in the Philippines, you hear Taglish for a mixture of English and Tagalog- the cash machines offer you a choice of English or Taglish so it's not derogatory, unless the banks enjoy insulting their customers. Then again...

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