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    #1

    kicked him running

    1-I kicked him running toward the goal.
    2-I kicked him running.

    3-I kicked him, running toward the goal.
    4-I kicked him, running.

    In which case:

    a-I was running/running toward the goal
    in which:
    b-he was running/running toward the goal
    and which are ambiguous?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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      • English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: kicked him running

    Quote Originally Posted by navi tasan View Post
    1-I kicked him running toward the goal.
    2-I kicked him running.

    3-I kicked him, running toward the goal.
    4-I kicked him, running.

    In which case:

    a-I was running/running toward the goal
    in which:
    b-he was running/running toward the goal
    and which are ambiguous?
    I'm not even sure I know what happened in any of the four sentences. You were running towards the goal and while you were running, you kicked someone male?
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  2. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: kicked him running

    Just say "I kicked him while I was running toward the goal" or "I kicked him while he was running toward the goal" and don't make your reader try to guess what you mean by playing with the placement of a comma.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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