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  1. #1
    Odessa Dawn's Avatar
    Odessa Dawn is offline Senior Member
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    Default "The words yes and no"



    "The words yes and no are not easily classified into any of the eight conventional parts of speech. Although sometimes classified as interjections, they do not qualify as such, and they are not adverbs. They are sometimes classified as a part of speech in their own right, sentence words, word sentences, or pro-sentences, although that category contains more than yes and no and not all linguists include them in their lists of sentence words."
    More: punctuation - Comma or semicolon after "No" when responding to a question - English Language and Usage

    Will you shed the some light on the underlined part, please? I couldn’t figure it out.
    Last edited by Odessa Dawn; 16-Dec-2012 at 05:10. Reason: Definite article "The" isn't needed.

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: "The words yes and no"

    They are sometimes considered to be a part of speech called "sentence words" or "word sentences" or "pro-sentences."

  3. #3
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "The words yes and no"

    Additionally, they can be called 'sentence substitutes' (COED).

    YOU: 'Are you happy?'

    ME: 'Yes.' (That's a substitute for 'I am happy'.)

    They can also be nouns:

    YOU: 'Are you sure you're happy?'

    ME: 'That's a definite yes.'

    Rover



    Rover

  4. #4
    Odessa Dawn's Avatar
    Odessa Dawn is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: "The words yes and no"


    Grateful! What does (COED) stand for, please? The Free Dictionary has been consulted and replied. Please excuse my ignorance.

  5. #5
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: "The words yes and no"

    I'm a bit stumped on that one too. I assume OED is Oxford English Dictionary, but the C has thrown me.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  6. #6
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: "The words yes and no"

    'Concise Oxford English Dictionary'.

  7. #7
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: "The words yes and no"

    Quote Originally Posted by Rover_KE View Post
    'Concise Oxford English Dictionary'.
    Of course! I only ever use the big one but I should still have worked that out!
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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