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Thread: Easygoing

  1. #11
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: Easygoing

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    Because in Webster's description of easygoing was this word "relaxed" which is associated (to me) with a low level of activity. Perhaps, Americans and the Britons have a different idea of this word?
    Some people (I am unfortunately not one of them) can work quite hard but remain relaxed.
    Last edited by 5jj; 15-Dec-2012 at 17:52. Reason: typo
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  2. #12
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    Default Re: Easygoing

    I wonder which came first, the adjective 'easygoing' or the idiomatic expression 'Easy come, easy go.'...? A visit to a decent dictionary beckons

    b

  3. #13
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    Default Re: Easygoing

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    I think part of some confusion comes from "good-humo(u)red" not being the same as "having a good sense of humor."
    Interesting! And I thought that the word humour "embeded" in "good-humoured" implies having a sence of humour. So, one can be good-humoured and have no sense of humo(u)r at the same time. On the other hand, as I see it, it's very hard to deal with a person having no sense of humour (in my experience).
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up.)

  4. #14
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    Default Re: Easygoing

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I wonder which came first, the adjective 'easygoing' or the idiomatic expression 'Easy come, easy go.'...? A visit to a decent dictionary beckons

    b
    The verbs are more important for survival, so they definitely came first And adjectives appeared later, when Man allowed himself to relax and gaze around at others.)
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up.)

  5. #15
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    Default Re: Easygoing

    As you can see from the definitions here, one's "humour" can refer to mood.

    He is in ill humour today = He is in a bad mood.
    She is very good-humoured = She is generally in a good mood.
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 15-Dec-2012 at 17:37.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  6. #16
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    Default Re: Easygoing

    Quote Originally Posted by englishhobby View Post
    it's very hard to deal with a person having no sense of humour (in my experience).
    Though I know some people with a "sarcastic" variety of sense of humour who are VERY hard to deal with. So, a sense of humour really doesn't matter.
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up.)

  7. #17
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    Default Re: Easygoing

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    Some people (I am unforunately not one of them) can work quite hard but remain relaxed.
    Indeed, words like "relaxed" and "good-humoured" are confusing to us, non-native speakers. ) Thank you for your comment, 5jj!
    If I were a native speaker of English, I would never shut up.)

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