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  1. #1
    Marina Gaidar's Avatar
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    Default His head sags, and he falls asleep right at the table

    I'm still experimenting with unknown words, unknown for me. Tell me, please, if this is correct "His head sags, and he falls asleep right at the table" (meaning that he is very drunk)? The word sag is new for me, so I'm not sure whether I can use it here.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: His head sags, and he falls asleep right at the table

    I wouldn't use it that way. I would say that his head drooped, or nodded.

    "Sag" usually refers to material (the roof of your tent starts to sag when it rains). The breasts of older women usually begin to sag (to point downwards instead of being pert).

    Apologies for the latter example but in BrE, it's a very common use of the word.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    Marina Gaidar's Avatar
    Marina Gaidar is offline Member
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    Default Re: His head sags, and he falls asleep right at the table

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I wouldn't use it that way. I would say that his head drooped, or nodded.

    "Sag" usually refers to material (the roof of your tent starts to sag when it rains). The breasts of older women usually begin to sag (to point downwards instead of being pert).

    Apologies for the latter example but in BrE, it's a very common use of the word.
    That's actually a very interesting information which I would never find in the dictionaries! Not that I use such expressions very often, but I am glad to learn anything not bookish! Though such sources of slang as the TV-series "The Misfits" left me with a mental trauma

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