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Thread: fasten

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    #1

    fasten

    Is the use of the word "fasten" in the following questions normal and correct?
    1. Is your dog fastened?
    2. Did you fasten your dog?
    3. I think this dog is unfastened. Be careful.

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    #2

    Re: fasten

    No. We don't speak of dogs being fastened. Belts may be fastened.

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    #3

    Re: fasten

    So what verb do we use to speak of dogs if "fasten" is not correct?

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    #4

    Re: fasten

    "Tied up" or "chained up."

  1. Barb_D's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: fasten

    And the thing that you hold when you walk with your dog is a "leash."

    While usually you see something like "Dogs must be on leashes" you may see something like "Leashed dogs only." But that means you are holding the leash yourself.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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    #6

    Re: fasten

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    And the thing that you hold when you walk with your dog is a "leash."

    While usually you see something like "Dogs must be on leashes" you may see something like "Leashed dogs only." But that means you are holding the leash yourself.
    In BrE we call a "leash" a "lead".

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    #7

    Re: fasten

    Horses have leads in the US. Dogs have leashes.

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    #8

    Re: fasten

    In the UK, horses can be on a rein if they're being led instead of ridden. Dogs are either on a lead or they're off the lead.

    Note that "lead" is pronounced the same way as the verb (sounds like "leed").
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 20-Dec-2012 at 23:18.
    Remember - if you don't use correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing, anything you write will be incorrect.

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    #9

    Re: fasten

    I meant a lead for walking a horse. What the jockey (or rider) holds is reins.

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    #10

    Re: fasten

    Can "tethered" be used instead of "chained up" in relation to dogs?

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