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  1. #1
    sky3120's Avatar
    sky3120 is offline Member
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    "I have come to help you."

    "I have come to help you."

    Is it okay to say "I come to help you" for the same meaning in casual conversation? I have seen sentences meaning "have come" but written in the form of "come". What do you native English speakers think? Thank you so much as usual and have a good day.

  2. #2
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    Re: "I have come to help you."

    The present simple is not normally an acceptable alternative to the present perfect; context will dictate which is appropriate.

  3. #3
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    sky3120 is offline Member
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    Re: "I have come to help you."

    Thank you so much as usual and the context is here.

    (A script from the Avengers)

    A : We have no quarrel with your people.

    B: An ant has no quarrel with a boot.

    A: Are you planning to step on us?

    B: I come with glad tidings of a world made free.

    A: Free from what?

    B: Freedom. Freedom is life's great lie.

    This is a script of the Avengers I am learning English with and I was wondering why there is "come" in the conversation. I think that considering the context, it should be "have come" or "came" or "have" is just omitted or is there a reason for the form?

    Thank you so much as always and I really appreciate your time and help.

  4. #4
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Re: "I have come to help you."

    Sky, you have been a member long enough to know that we need the context in post #1 rather than #3 after somebody has had to ask for it.

    In that dialogue 'I come' means 'I am here'. The dialogue has a literary/dated feel to it.


    Rover

  5. #5
    sky3120's Avatar
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    Re: "I have come to help you."

    Thank you and I am sorry, but actually I wanted to ask the #3 question in the first place and I thought the #1 is related to #3. From now on, I will be very careful not to waste your time.

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