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    #1

    it takes two/it takes two to tango

    Hello

    It takes two AND It takes two to tango. Are both these expressions used? Is one of them more common?

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    #2

    Re: it takes two/it takes two to tango

    Quote Originally Posted by GUEST2008 View Post
    Hello

    It takes two AND It takes two to tango. Are both these expressions used? Is one of them more common?
    I have heard/read both.

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: it takes two/it takes two to tango

    The full expression is "It takes two to tango". However, the expression is so well-known and used that it is frequently shortened to "It takes two" and it is assumed that the listener will get the gist without the final two words.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #4

    Re: it takes two/it takes two to tango

    Unfortunately for ESL students, we commonly truncate common idioms, proverbs, clichés etc, expecting listeners to finish them for themselves.

    A: 'So many people have given me their advice I just don't know what to do.'

    B: 'That's your problem: too many cooks....'

    A: 'I'll just have to wait and see what happens.'

    B: 'That'll be best. Don't count your chickens....'

    Doesn't this happen in other languages?

    Rover

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