Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. #1
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    769
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default A question about bring and take

    I've studied some phrasal verbs with "bring" and "take" recently and I have some questions about some:
    1) The first one is about "to bring over" and "to take over": I have doubt that I do hope you can dispel...
    "to bring over" is when someone takes something exactly where I am or where the person who is speaking at that moment is...is that correct? For example: Yestarday I lent you the umbrella, so please bring it over (meaning that I want him to take it to my house)....
    "to take over", for the meaning I'm interested in, is when a person takes something from a place to another, but not where this person is...is that correct? For example, if I want to bring a bunch of flowers to my girlfriend's house I could say: Before coming back home, I want to take some flowers over to her. Now, with this meaning "to take over", as far as I've understood, would be similar to the simple verb "to bring" in this case, is it right?
    Are there any differences between: 1) Before coming back home, I want to take some flowers over to her. 2) Before coming back home, I want to bring her some flowers. ?

    2) "to bring along" is used just for people and specifically when someone wants to bring somebody else with him/herself, maybe somewhere...is that correct?

    3) "to bring around" is used just for things, for objects, when someone wants to bring something somewhere, maybe a cd to a party or a camera to a particular event...and so on....is this correct?


    These are the verbs I have come across and the ones I have some doubts about. Moreover, on the Internet I have read that, behind the general rule, the use of each of these verbs depends on the speaker, on his/her point of view and on the common usage in American English and in British English, which could be different. For all these reasons, I'd like you all, native speakers, both Americans and British, could help me understand it.
    Thanks you all in advance.

    P.S. If there are more phrasal verbs associated with "bring" and "take" I haven't come across yet and you want to suggest them, I'd appreciate it very much.

  2. #2
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: A question about bring and take

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    I've studied some phrasal verbs with "bring" and "take" recently and I have some questions about some:
    1) The first one is about "to bring over" and "to take over": I have doubt that I do hope you can dispel...
    "to bring over" is when someone takes something exactly where I am or where the person who is speaking at that moment is...is that correct? For example: Yestarday I lent you the umbrella, so please bring it over (meaning that I want him to take it to my house)....
    "to take over", for the meaning I'm interested in, is when a person takes something from a place to another, but not where this person is...is that correct? For example, if I want to bring a bunch of flowers to my girlfriend's house I could say: Before coming back home, I want to take some flowers over to her. Now, with this meaning "to take over", as far as I've understood, would be similar to the simple verb "to bring" in this case, is it right?
    Are there any differences between: 1) Before coming back home, I want to take some flowers over to her. 2) Before coming back home, I want to bring her some flowers. ?
    You are basically right. We bring things to where we (or the person addressed) are, or will be, and take them somewhere else. If you are carrying the flowers to your girlfriend's house, you will probably tell someone who is not, or will not be, at her house that you are taking them. You will tell your girlfriend or someone who is, or will be, at her house that you are bringing them.

    However, in casual conversation, we don't always think about the finer points; for example, if I (being somewhere other than at my girlfriend's house) am speaking to my girlfriend's mother, who happens to live in the same house as my girlfriend, but who at the time of our conversation is somewhere else, I may use either verb. If that sounds complicated, don't worry. I have given that example simply to explain why sometimes people may appear to use the verb we wouldn't expect.

  3. #3
    MartinEnglish is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Sep 2012
    Posts
    127
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: A question about bring and take

    Maybe it's helpful to remember that "bring it there" and "take it here" are always wrong - these are the most common and important errors made by learners regarding these two words.

  4. #4
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    769
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: A question about bring and take

    The main concept is quite clear...but what about the verbs I wrote? Anyone who can help me?
    Last edited by dilodi83; 22-Dec-2012 at 14:00.

  5. #5
    dilodi83 is offline Senior Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Italian
      • Home Country:
      • Italy
      • Current Location:
      • Italy
    Join Date
    Aug 2006
    Posts
    769
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: A question about bring and take

    Any help?

  6. #6
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    17,392
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: A question about bring and take

    "Bring along" means something or someone comes with you as you go.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

Similar Threads

  1. Question about 'bring back'
    By learning54 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 12-Jan-2012, 14:14
  2. bring along - bring round
    By dilodi83 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 20-Sep-2011, 19:30
  3. Bring into question
    By Manal-88 in forum English Idioms and Sayings
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 11-Apr-2009, 16:49
  4. bring into question,compare,adulterate
    By twilit1988 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 26-Jan-2009, 20:13
  5. bring along or bring back
    By sara98 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 09-Oct-2007, 15:42

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •