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  1. #1
    sitifan is offline Senior Member
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    immediate future, die

    1. He's dying.
    2. He's going to die.
    What's the difference in meaning between the above two sentences?

  2. #2
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    Barb_D is offline Moderator
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    Re: immediate future, die

    All of us are going to die someday.
    Someone who is "dying" is in the process of dying - from a fatal illness, over days; from a fall over a cliff, in moments. The end is imminent.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. #3
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    Re: immediate future, die

    [I am not a teacher]

    In my opinion, they could both mean the same. 'He is going to die' suggests it will happen soon, maybe sooner than expected.

  4. #4
    sitifan is offline Senior Member
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    Re: immediate future, die

    Quote Originally Posted by Barb_D View Post
    All of us are going to die someday.
    Someone who is "dying" is in the process of dying - from a fatal illness, over days; from a fall over a cliff, in moments. The end is imminent.
    When someone says, "I am going to be late," being late is also imminent, isn't it?

  5. #5
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    Re: immediate future, die

    Quote Originally Posted by sitifan View Post
    When someone says, "I am going to be late," being late is also imminent, isn't it?
    Of a person who is approaching death, we can say 'He is dying' or 'He is going to die'. The former lays more stress on the imminence of the demise.

  6. #6
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    Odessa Dawn is offline Senior Member
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    Re: immediate future, die



    Do "I am dying" and "I am exhausted" share the same meaning?


  7. #7
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Re: immediate future, die

    No, they don't.

    However, not involving actual death, you can say 'I'm dying to meet André Rieu', 'I'd die for a cup of tea', 'She'll die if he doesn't call soon.' (See definition 13 here.)

    Rover

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