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    #1

    to go in for vs to get off on

    Hi,
    how can you define the verb "to go in for" and the verb "to get off on"? How to use them correctly? Because they both mean that someone likes to do something but, I caught that they are used for different situations; I cannot understand when I have to use one rather than the other. Can you help me understand how to use them?

  1. emsr2d2's Avatar
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      • English Teacher
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    #2

    Re: to go in for vs to get off on

    Quote Originally Posted by dilodi83 View Post
    Hi,
    how can you define the verb "to go in for" and the verb "to get off on"? How to use them correctly? Because they both mean that someone likes to do something but, I caught that they are used for different situations; I cannot understand when I have to use one rather than the other. Can you help me understand how to use them?

    "To go in for" simply means to enjoy or participate in something. "To get off on" suggests far more heightened sense of enjoyment, almost leading to sexual gratification in some cases. It can also be slightly negative, when someone really enjoys something that's unpleasant for someone else.

    I don't really go in for romantic films.
    I enjoyed school but I didn't really go in for extra-curricular activities.

    My friend really gets off on Brad Pitt films!
    Why are you so horrible to me? Do you get off on seeing me get upset?
    My boss used to really get off on making us stay late every night.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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    #3

    Re: to go in for vs to get off on

    I wouldn't use "get off on" in polite company.

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