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  1. #1
    david11's Avatar
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    Default accuse of vs accuse us of

    It is unfair to accuse of trying to get out of answering questions.

    Shouldn't there be a noun after accuse like"It is unfair to accuse us of trying to get out of answering questions"?

    I think it should be, but one of the moderator wrote it. Can it be used without noun there?

    I also have confusion over the usage of "get out" here. In the thread, it was not the moderator's original sentence but he/she tries to reply it without changing the structure of the original sentence.

    Sixth post in this thread.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: accuse of vs accuse us of

    Quote Originally Posted by david11 View Post
    It is unfair to accuse of trying to get out of answering questions.

    Shouldn't there be a noun after accuse like"It is unfair to accuse us of trying to get out of answering questions"?

    I think it should be, but one of the moderator wrote it. Can it be used without noun there?

    I also have confusion over the usage of "get out" here. In the thread, it was not the moderator's original sentence but he/she tries to reply it without changing the structure of the original sentence.

    Sixth post in this thread.
    Firstly, thank you for alerting my attention to a typo in my post. Shock horror! Moderators/native speakers make typos. Oh yes we do! So I have gone back and amended it. It should have read "It is unfair to accuse us ..."

    I don't understand your final point. The OP was quoted as having said that it appeared that we were trying to get out of answering [his/her] questions by claiming that he/she was trying to get us to do homework. I simply stated that it was unfair to accuse us of trying to do that. Where is your confusion?
    Last edited by emsr2d2; 01-Jan-2013 at 14:45.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    david11's Avatar
    david11 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: accuse of vs accuse us of

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Firstly, thank you for alerting my attention to a typo in my post. Shock horror! Moderators/native speakers make typos. Oh yes we do! So I have gone back and amended it. It should have read "It is unfair to accuse us ..."
    It is no shock that moderators do make typos. I was just making sure if it is typo or really it can be said in that way(A lot of things which I thought to be typos, are actually naturally in English).

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I don't understand your final point. The OP was quoted as having said that it appeared that we were trying to get out of answering [his/her] questions by claiming that he/she was trying to get us to do homework. I simply stated that it was unfair to accuse us of trying to do that. Where is your confusion?
    Oh! I apologize. I read it wrong. From the context, I guessed he meant that you(moderators) were trying to get the answer out of him. So, the order of words confused me. I think "avoiding answering his questions" would have been clear. I haven't heard "get out of" used it in that.

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: accuse of vs accuse us of

    Yes, "to get out of" means "to avoid doing" or "to extricate yourself from doing something which you had previously committed to doing".

    I pretended I was sick to get out of going to that awful party.
    She got out of marrying that dreadful man by moving to Australia!
    I hate going to the dentist. I'll always get out of it if I can.
    My flatmate washes up very badly. I'm sure he's trying to get out of doing it completely.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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