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Thread: Can't believe

  1. #1
    Jadoon 84 is offline Member
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    Default Can't believe

    England are already 1-0 up, and a win today will hand them the series. Can't believe this contest is more than halfway through already.
    Explain the red coloured sentence of this paragraph. There is no Noun or pronoun before Can't believe, which creates difficulty to understand the sentence. Please give one more example of such a sentence.

    With Kind Regards

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Can't believe

    Quote Originally Posted by Jadoon 84 View Post
    England are already 1-0 up, and a win today will hand them the series. Can't believe this contest is more than halfway through already.
    Explain the red coloured sentence of this paragraph. There is no Noun or pronoun before Can't believe, which creates difficulty to understand the sentence. Please give one more example of such a sentence.

    With Kind Regards
    This sounds like a transcript of something that perhaps a sports commentator said, or maybe something someone put on Twitter during the cricket. It's very simple. The missing word is "I" and it is implied. If I said to my friend "My bike has just been stolen for the third time this month! Can't believe it!"

    In spoken English, we do this kind of thing all the time. "I had a dreadful meal at that pizza place last night. Never going there again!" Obviously, the full sentence would be "I am never going there again!" but it's omitted because it's quite clear that I'm talking about myself. I would not say "I had a dread meal at that pizza place last night. My mother is never going there again!"
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: Can't believe

    Where did you read or hear this? In speech or informal writing like texting, this sort of thing happens- to understand it, simply insert the most likely noun or pronoun.

  4. #4
    Jadoon 84 is offline Member
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    Default Re: Can't believe

    I read it in live cricket commentary at Live Cricket Scores | Cricket news, statistics | ESPN Cricinfo. A platform where written commentary is provided for every single ball.

  5. #5
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: Can't believe

    Quote Originally Posted by Jadoon 84 View Post
    I read it in live cricket commentary at Live Cricket Scores | Cricket news, statistics | ESPN Cricinfo. A platform where written commentary is provided for every single ball.
    Aha! There you go, then. As I said in my first response, it sounded like something from a commentary. Always remember that in spoken English, we don't always follow the rules of grammatical written English. A transcript of something which was said without a script (ie when a sports commentator is following the action and trying to describe it at the same time) will frequently have missing words, changes of direction halfway through a sentence, pauses in strange places etc.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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