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  1. #1
    Will17 is offline Senior Member
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    Cool Able to convey a message and to ?

    Hello!

    Do we need a second "to" after "and" here, please?

    "She is able to convey a message quite easily and to explain things consistently".

    Thanks a lot for your help.
    Will

  2. #2
    Rover_KE is online now Moderator
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    Re: Able to convey a message and to ?

    No. it's not necessary here as the two things she can do are closely related.

    If they had been different, a second 'to' would be preferable IMO.

    'She is able to play the Moonlight Sonata from memory on the grand piano and (to) crotchet.'

    Rover

  3. #3
    Getemjan is offline Newbie
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    Re: Able to convey a message and to ?

    There are a few expressions in English that use the "simple form" or "bare infinitive." (These may not be the commonly-used terms for this construction, but are the ones I have heard used before.)

    Example: I saw him *cross* the street (not "to cross").

    A common infinitive with which we often omit the "to" is the verb "help." which can take either a regular infinitive or a bare infinitive:
    I will help you do that.
    I will help you to do that.

    In the example you give, there is a compound infinitive (to convey and to explain). Since "to" is present in the sentence with "convey," it is unnecessary to repeat "to" with "explain" because its prior use is understood by the listener/reader.

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