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Thread: many more fish

  1. #11
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: many more fish

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I learned from my highschool English teacher that "much, a lot, far, still, far" can be used to emphasize comparatives, and have seen such a usage in many examples like doubling or tripling the orginal number.
    Yes, but your original question was about substituting these words for "many". Have you forgotten that?
    You can say, "A has ten million dollars; B has even more - twenty million dollars." This is an emphasis, and even though 20 is indeed "much more" than 10, that is not an assertion made by the sentence. Yes, you might have been misinterpreting it.

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    Default Re: many more fish

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    I learned from my highschool English teacher that "much, a lot, far, still, far" can be used to emphasize comparatives, and have seen such a usage in many examples like doubling or tripling the orginal number.

    But some of you say the last two(still, far) don't have such a meaning, which frustrates me. I probably have misinterepted such an exceptional usage so far.
    Keannu, a lot of what teachers and books (both good and bad) tell us is general advice. There are almost no absolutes in language. I think that some of your frustration with English stems from the fact that you seem to want a watertight answer for everything; one seldom exists. Although I occasionally break my own rule, I strive not to use the words 'never' and 'always' when talking about English.

    Words and the way they are put together are not science. I would guess that 99% of spoken utterances are made without planning, and many, many things are written without real thought. Grammarians and lexicographers simply try to see some form of order in what native speakers produce.

    I would suggest that you try to take a slightly more relaxed approach to the language. General rules are (generally) helpful. It's not the end of the world if not everything can be neatly slotted into a precise position in some artificial grid.

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