Results 1 to 5 of 5
  1. #1
    lazyboy is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • Malayalam
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default I wish to drive your thoughts

    I want to know if this usage is correct... when we actually wish to tell a group of people to think about a subject/topic


    "Dear Friends,

    I wish to drive your thoughts on the topic "why be prepared""



    more specifically the usage "drive your thoughts" does that convey correct meaning?

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    22,837
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I wish to drive your thoughts

    If someone told me they wanted to drive my thoughts, I would think they meant they wanted somehow to steer what I was thinking, not just what I was thinking about.

    If you said "I wish to drive/steer your thoughts towards the topic "Why be prepared?"" that would be clearer.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    JMurray is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • New Zealand
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Nov 2010
    Posts
    1,653
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I wish to drive your thoughts

    I wish to drive your thoughts on the topic "why be prepared".
    It's not a natural phrase.
    Possibly:
    "I'd like to direct your attention to the topic…"
    "I'd like you to turn your attention/thoughts to…".

    not a teacher

  4. #4
    lazyboy is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • Malayalam
      • Home Country:
      • India
      • Current Location:
      • India
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    2
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I wish to drive your thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If someone told me they wanted to drive my thoughts, I would think they meant they wanted somehow to steer what I was thinking, not just what I was thinking about.

    If you said "I wish to drive/steer your thoughts towards the topic "Why be prepared?"" that would be clearer.

    Don't know if I am wrong but i feel 'drive your thoughts' conveys a different meaning like direct person (one can think in correct sense.. but does it grammatically and logically convey the meaning)
    like wise 'steer' conveys correct meaning

    i am not sure that is why seeking expert opinion..
    thanks

  5. #5
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    22,837
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: I wish to drive your thoughts

    Quote Originally Posted by lazyboy View Post
    Don't know if I am wrong but I feel 'drive your thoughts' conveys a different meaning like direct person (one can think in correct sense but does it grammatically and logically convey the meaning).
    like wise Likewise, 'steer' conveys correct meaning.

    I am not sure, that is why I am seeking expert opinion.
    Thanks.
    That's what I said. "Drive your thoughts about/on [topic]" sounds as if someone wants to tell you how to think, wants to tell you what your opinion should be.
    "Drive your thoughts towards" simply means that they want you to start thinking about something.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 5
    Last Post: 14-Mar-2012, 22:05
  2. [Grammar] Are you having second thoughts about this?
    By Ferdie11 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 14-Feb-2012, 10:06
  3. far from our thoughts?
    By sky753 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 25-Sep-2009, 03:01
  4. drive slow or drive slowly?
    By peterwook in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 21-May-2008, 17:52
  5. drive "slow" or drive "slowly": the diff
    By infinikyte in forum General Language Discussions
    Replies: 16
    Last Post: 28-Dec-2003, 17:15

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •