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Thread: Rover = bicycle

  1. #21
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Re: Rover = bicycle

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    Duct tape - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Interesting article. I've always known it as "duct tape" and assumed people who thought it was "duck" were simply mis-hearing things.

    Turns out that it was originally "duck," but "duct" is the term in common use since the 1950s.

    There is a brand "Duck" but they call it "Duck brand duct tape."
    So I was right and wrong. That seems fair!
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  2. #22
    JarekSteliga is offline Member
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    Re: Rover = bicycle

    Wellington, mackintosh, macadam. The last one is in use in my country. I think all road builders know and use the word, but few if any know where it came from.

  3. #23
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    Re: Rover = bicycle

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    Returning to the first post, I believe in Ireland, or in a part of Ireland, or in the imagination of Flann O'Brien, there was a brand of bicycle that was used generically. It's a while since I read The Third Policeman so I forget what the name was.

    b

    PS Incidentally, that book examines the possibility of the transformation that Rover feared (a man turning into a bicycle)
    I think it was in the imagination of Brian O'Nolan. (as was Flann O'Brien and Myles Na Gopaleen) I love "The Third Policeman".

  4. #24
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    Re: Rover = bicycle

    Do people in the UK still use mackintosh for raincoat?

  5. #25
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    Re: Rover = bicycle

    A few do. More than a few use 'mac'. This allows for one of my favourite jokes:

    'Have you got a light, Mac?'
    'No, but I've got a dark green overcoat.'
    b

  6. #26
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    Re: Rover = bicycle

    I would use mac, raincoat or anorak, but I don't think I've ever actually said mackintosh.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  7. #27
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    Re: Rover = bicycle

    I think, possibly, the word 'makintosh' - on those rare occasions when it's used - usually refers specifically to a garment made of that particular rubberized fabric. Otherwise it's just one of your options.

    BNC had hundreds of instances of Mackintosh, but I soon realized that they were almost all using it as a surname. When I narrowed it down by putting 'rain' in the context, I found only one instance. It was in a piece of fiction, and I didn't delve far enough to determine when it was set or written: 'Best take yer cap and mackintosh. Looks like rain.'

    b

  8. #28
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    Re: Rover = bicycle

    I think, possibly, the word 'mackintosh' - on those rare occasions when it's used - usually refers specifically to a garment made of that particular rubberized fabric. Otherwise it's just one of your options.

    BNC had hundreds of instances of Mackintosh, but I soon realized that they were almost all using it as a surname. When I narrowed it down by putting 'rain' in the context, I found only one instance. It was in a piece of fiction, and I didn't delve far enough to determine when it was set or written: 'Best take yer cap and mackintosh. Looks like rain.'

    b

    PS Couldn't resist - I did check. It was from Goodnight Mister Tom, so written in second half of the 20th century but set in wartime Britain - probably 1941, as it dealt with an evacuee from London during the Blitz. The author was emphasizing the 'rusticness', and 'old-fashioned-ness' of the speaker.
    Last edited by BobK; 12-Jan-2013 at 18:04. Reason: Added PS

  9. #29
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    Re: Rover = bicycle

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    "Scotch" is very rarely used in the UK to describe the nationality of people. "Scottish" is the most common word.
    Despite my great age and (thin) veneer of civilisation, I remain tempted to punch anyone who describes me as "Scotch", as opposed to "Scottish" or "Scots" See you, Jimmie!!
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

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