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  1. #1
    Odessa Dawn's Avatar
    Odessa Dawn is online now Senior Member
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    Default "Be anxious for nothing, "


    "Be anxious for nothing, …"
    Philippians 4:6

    I think that the underlined part is Imperative mood. However, when it is followed by for nothing, how do I analyze it? There is an another pattern that goes with it but it is not suitable to be posted in here. Under which grammar point "Be anxious for nothing" goes, please?

    Thank you,
    Last edited by Odessa Dawn; 10-Jan-2013 at 02:06. Reason: Delete "worry never hurries answer"

  2. #2
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    Default Re: "Be anxious for nothing, "

    OD, you are correct! "Be anxious for nothing, ..." is an imperative sentence.

    The "mood" is in the imperative which means "a command", "absolutely necessary", "forceful", or "demanding". In other words, it is not a suggestion. In Philippians 4:6 Paul is speaking by divine inspiration, therefore God is saying we have the potential to live anxiety free here on Earth.

    Imagine what would happen to the imperative sentence if "for nothing" was left out! We would be left with a command to "be anxious"! Is that the message Paul was meant to deliver? I don't think so!

    Cheers,
    A4

  3. #3
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: "Be anxious for nothing, "

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post
    However, when it is followed by for nothing, how do I analyze it?
    How does for nothing change the mood?

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: "Be anxious for nothing, "

    Quote Originally Posted by amigos4 View Post
    Imagine what would happen to the imperative sentence if "for nothing" was left out! We would be left with a command to "be anxious"! Is that the message Paul was meant to deliver? I don't think so!

    A4
    Though it could be ambiguous anyway. If I often got anxious for nothing would that make me a good Christian?

  5. #5
    SoothingDave is online now VIP Member
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    Default Re: "Be anxious for nothing, "

    "Don't be anxious about anything" would probably be how we would write this today. Or "Don't let anything make you anxious."

  6. #6
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    Default Re: "Be anxious for nothing, "

    OD, I get the impression that a lot of your source are Biblical. That is a very old translation (that was, at the time of the translation, intentionally archaic - so as to sound more resonant when read out in Church - reading out in Church was an avowed aim of the King James Bible).

    If you talk like this you will be thought very odd. Raymott's (mis)interpretation is the most likely in modern English.

    b

  7. #7
    Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    Default Re: "Be anxious for nothing, "



    My greetings!
    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    "Don't be anxious about anything" would probably be how we would write this today. Or "Don't let anything make you anxious."
    Well put!

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post

    If you talk like this you will be thought very odd. Raymott's (mis)interpretation is the most likely in modern English.

    b
    Grateful!
    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    How does for nothing change the mood?
    I got confused when I came across an imperative mood being followed by for nothing. I thought it was supposed to be, "Don’t be worry/anxious!" I don’t know what the purpose of for nothing is?

    Thank you all,
    Last edited by Odessa Dawn; 10-Jan-2013 at 23:59.

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