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  1. #1
    Tedwonny is offline Member
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    Default Could you read this already?

    Any offence is purely coincidental ; -)
    I'm just giving a go at using 'already' in this daring manner. I've watched a series of drama recently and the characters all speak American English. I just cant help noticing the overwhelming ubiquity of 'already' in their conversations. "Will you get over here already", "Hurry up and climb over already"...

    Honestly, I have never in my entire life have thought of already being used like this. Could someone please explain a bit more. It's not something dictionary can explains easily. Is it really catching on in America? What other words can replace it retaining the same meaning?

    I still don't really get what the two already's are doing above. Is the title right? haha

    Thanks a great deal!

  2. #2
    Gillnetter is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: Could you read this already?

    Quote Originally Posted by Tedwonny View Post
    Any offence is purely coincidental ; -)
    I'm just giving a go at using 'already' in this daring manner. I've watched a series of drama recently and the characters all speak American English. I just cant help noticing the overwhelming ubiquity of 'already' in their conversations. "Will you get over here already", "Hurry up and climb over already"...

    Honestly, I have never in my entire life have thought of already being used like this. Could someone please explain a bit more. It's not something dictionary can explains easily. Is it really catching on in America? What other words can replace it retaining the same meaning?
    I believe that using "already" this way was more popular in the 1940s and in the New York City area. It still may be used in some places. The "already" means do it now.

    I still don't really get what the two already's are doing above. Is the title right? haha
    When I hear this word used this way I think of someone from an Italian neighborhood in New York or New Jersey. Maybe some of the members from the East coast would have a better understanding if the word is still used to mean "do it now". I haven't heard it recently on the West coast.

    Thanks a great deal!
    Gil

  3. #3
    Rover_KE is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Could you read this already?

    It's clear enough in this dictionary:

    already

    5. (American spoken) used for telling someone they should do something immediately.

    Stop messing around and get in here already!
    (Macmillan)

    Rover

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