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Thread: Want to?

  1. #1
    Energy Engineer is offline Newbie
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    Want to?

    I have not understood how to use the verb "want to". I talk to my friend and I say: "Do you want to swim?" What I mean?

    1) Do you want I swim?
    2) Do you want you swim?
    3) Do you want we swim?

    Thank you.

  2. #2
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    Re: Want to?

    It can mean, 'Do you wish to go into the water and swim (alone)' or 'Do you wish for both of us to go in the water and swim'. It cannot mean, 'Do you wish for me to go in the water and swim (alone).

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    Energy Engineer is offline Newbie
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    Re: Want to?

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    It can mean, 'Do you wish to go into the water and swim (alone)' or 'Do you wish for both of us to go in the water and swim'. It cannot mean, 'Do you wish for me to go in the water and swim (alone).
    Thank you. So how can I know if the question "Do you want to go to swim?, means:

    Do you wish for you to go into the water and swim (alone)?

    or

    Do you wish for both of us to go in the water and swim?

    And how can I say "Do you wish for me to go in the water and swim (alone)?"
    Last edited by Energy Engineer; 16-Jan-2013 at 14:48.

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    Re: Want to?

    Quote Originally Posted by Energy Engineer View Post
    Thank you. So how can I know if the question "Do you want to go to swim?, means: Do you wish for you to go into the water and swim (alone)?

    or Do you wish for both of us to go in the water and swim?
    Context of situation.
    And how can I say "Do you wish for me to go in the water and swim (alone)?"
    Say that, or "Do you want me to go in (to the water) and swim?"

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    Energy Engineer is offline Newbie
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    Re: Want to?

    Ok, I understand... Thank you 5jj...

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    Re: Want to?

    People learning English don't seem to understand how important context is. It's hard for me to imagine that in your own languages you don't have things that can mean different things in different situations.
    Last edited by Rover_KE; 17-Jan-2013 at 00:20.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  7. #7
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    Re: Want to?

    If a non-native speaker asked me "Do you want to swim?", I would assume he/she meant "Do you want to go swimming [with me]?"
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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