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  1. #1
    Hugo_Lin is offline Junior Member
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    Default “ when I brought the fish in too green”...what does "green" mean here?

    Hi, teachers:

    I'm reading
    Ernest Hemingway‘s novel
    The Old Man and the Sea
    and have difficulty understanding a sentence:

    "...
    you nearly were killed when I brought the fish in too green and he nearly tore the boat to pieces.
    "

    I'm very much confused how can a fish be brought in "too green"? What does it mean?

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    probus is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: “ when I brought the fish in too green”...what does "green" mean here?

    Hemingway means the fish was not sufficiently exhausted. It had far too much strength left when it was brought alongside (or perhaps into) the boat.

    I've never seen or heard this usage of green in respect to fish anywhere else, but the meaning is crystal clear.

  3. #3
    Hugo_Lin is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: “ when I brought the fish in too green”...what does "green" mean here?

    Quote Originally Posted by probus View Post
    Hemingway means the fish was not sufficiently exhausted. It had far too much strength left when it was brought alongside (or perhaps into) the boat.

    I've never seen or heard this usage of green in respect to fish anywhere else, but the meaning is crystal clear.
    Many words and expressions of Hemingway are very unfamiliar to me.

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