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  1. keannu's Avatar
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    #1

    to be frank with you

    These absolute infinitives frequently appear in most grammar books in Korea, but I doubt if they are actually used much in reality, especially "to be frank with you". Isn't "actully" more used than that? And what about the others?

    gz115)
    1.To tell (you) the truth
    2. To begin with
    3. To be frank (with you)
    4. not to mention(=not to speak of)
    5. to be sure
    6. to make a long story short.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: to be frank with you

    I think 'frankly' is more common that 'to be frank with you', but the others are common enough.

    I cut rather than make a long story short.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: to be frank with you

    No. They're quite common - particular among people who want to avoid dangling participles, as in

    'JudgingTo judge by the weather forecast, this is a bad day for travelling.'

    (Of course, that's not the only use. A lot of them are fixed sentence modifiers; they occupy some space in a conversation without involving much thought [whil the speaker marshalls his/her thoughts.)

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  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: to be frank with you

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    ...

    I cut rather than make a long story short.
    I think 'make' is the Am Eng preference. It sounds very odd to me too.

    b

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    #5

    Re: to be frank with you

    Quote Originally Posted by BobK View Post
    I think 'make' is the Am Eng preference. It sounds very odd to me too.

    b
    Yes, we make a long story short.

  5. keannu's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: to be frank with you

    Not "actually" for "to be frank with you"? Is "actually" quite different from "frankly"?

  6. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: to be frank with you

    Yes - in speakers who care what they mean; but sometimes they are used as a general-purpose sentence-modifier, to buy time - especially in something like a media interview.

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    #8

    Re: to be frank with you

    *NOT A TEACHER* "Frank" and "frankly" are both modifiers derived from the noun "frankness" which indicates plainness and candor in the communication. "Frank" is the adjective form, as in: "We should have a frank conversation about your ideas." "Frankly" is the adverb form, as in: "Frankly speaking, I think this is a very bad idea." "Actually" is also an adverb which indicates (1) it is a current event or circumstance, or (2) it is factual - however this word lacks the emphasis of being candid and plainspoken that "frankly" does.

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    #9

    Re: to be frank with you

    "Actually" is used when stating something true, and usually when correcting an error or misconception.

    "Frankly" is used when expressing an opinion or a fact that may be difficult to admit or difficult to hear. When one is speaking candidly.

  7. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: to be frank with you

    A lot of them are fixed sentence modifiers; they occupy some space in a conversation without involving much thought [whil the speaker marshalls his/her thoughts.)

    Following on from Bobk's comment above; by far the most commonly used of these expressions in BrE is "Well". Watch anyone being asked a question on television. They will almost invariably start their reply with "Well...."
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

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