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  1. #1
    Cristina.W is offline Newbie
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    Default 'It is not something to panic for'

    I used the sentence above in one of my compositions, and my English teacher said that I should have written 'It is not anything to panic for' because of the negation rule, but I don't think she's right. I was talking about a proper situation, not something general.
    Can you please clarify this?

    I also was wondering,
    when you're talking about cooking, for instance, would you say 'it's not something I'm good at' or 'it's not anything I'm good at'?
    Last edited by Cristina.W; 26-Jan-2013 at 21:46. Reason: more details

  2. #2
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    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: 'It is not something to panic for'

    I'd prefer 'It's not something to panic about'. The negation 'rule' is not a rule at all. You are right; 'something' is possible.

    In your cooking example, I think 'something' is the more likely choice.

  3. #3
    hombre viejo is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: 'It is not something to panic for'

    *NOT A TEACHER" American English. Your question is asking whether "something" or "anything" is the better word to use. "Something" is a pronoun referring to a certain, although unspecified thing. "Anything" is a pronoun referring to anything, - not a certain thing, but something, no matter what. Because you are referring to "it" as the suject - I agree with you - not your teacher. "I can't see anything and "I (do) see something" are examples of correct usage."

    Regarding your second question - I would choose "something" regardless of the negation. The reference is to something certain - cooking or 'It"

  4. #4
    BobK's Avatar
    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: 'It is not something to panic for'

    Nobody has mentioned 'nothing' yet. I use 'It's nothing to worry about' much more than 'It's not something to worry about'. I'd use 'something' only if there was much more to the sentence: 'It's not something that you should be worrying about at this stage.'

    b

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