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Thread: In or over?

  1. Over the top's Avatar
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    #1

    In or over?

    ...rain drops that are falling in [city]

    Is it "in" or "over"

    Also can I say rain drops that are falling in [city] thunder storm?

  2. Grumpy's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: In or over?

    You could use either of them, as well as "on".
    For your second question, the idea would normally be expressed as something like"...rain drops that are falling from a thunderstorm over [city]" or "..rain drops that are falling in/on [city] from a thunderstorm".
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  3. probus's Avatar
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    #3

    Re: In or over?

    We normally treat rain as an uncountable noun, rather than mentioning the individual drops.

    Rain is falling in (city) is simple, natural and good.

    Even more common would be:

    It's raining in (city).
    Last edited by probus; 29-Jan-2013 at 04:32. Reason: correct typo

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