Results 1 to 4 of 4
  1. #1
    GabrielPaix„o is offline Newbie
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Brazilian Portuguese
      • Home Country:
      • Brazil
      • Current Location:
      • Brazil
    Join Date
    Jan 2013
    Posts
    10
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default What's the difference between "at" and "in" ?

    I want to know when can I use "at" and "in" ?
    Example: At school / In school
    What's the difference ?

    Thanks.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • England
    Join Date
    Apr 2008
    Posts
    22,656
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What's the difference between "at" and "in" ?

    Quote Originally Posted by GabrielPaix„o View Post
    I want to know when can I use "at" and "in" ?
    Example: At school / In school
    What's the difference ?

    Thanks.
    In BrE we usually say "at school" to mean someone is a pupil/student at an educational establishment other than college or university.

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    23,513
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What's the difference between "at" and "in" ?

    We use "at school" to explain that they are between the ages of 4 and 16 and are therefore in compulsory education at either a primary, a junior or a secondary school.
    How many kids do you have at university?
    None. My kids are 8, 11 and 14. They're all [still] at school.

    We also say "at school" to give a pupil's location on an individual day.
    Where's your daughter?
    She's at school. She will be home at 4pm.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  4. #4
    billmcd is offline Key Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2009
    Posts
    3,505
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: What's the difference between "at" and "in" ?

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    Pardon me emsr2d2 for using your response as a way to identify the differences between BrE and AmE. We use "at school" to explain that they are between the ages of 4 and 16 and are therefore in compulsory education at either a primary, a junior or a secondary school. In AmE we would not use "at" in this way. We would typically use "in".
    How many kids do you have at university? In AmE you would typically hear, "How many kids do you have 'in college'?", regardless of whether the institution is classified as a college or university.
    None. My kids are 8, 11 and 14. They're all [still] at school. We would use "in".

    We also say "at school" to give a pupil's location on an individual day. Same in AmE.
    Where's your daughter?
    She's at school. She will be home at 4pm.
    b.

Similar Threads

  1. Replies: 4
    Last Post: 17-Sep-2012, 04:23
  2. The difference between "pathways", "tracks", and "orbits"
    By shaima19991 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 28-Mar-2012, 18:30
  3. [Vocabulary] Difference between "health" and "wellness", "Diagnosis" and "Analysis"
    By tobysky in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 28-Dec-2010, 22:43
  4. [Grammar] Difference between "ing"&"simple present" after "to"
    By Gavin1705 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 21-Jul-2010, 23:51
  5. Replies: 7
    Last Post: 19-Jun-2008, 01:46

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •