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  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #1

    "have/has been in" versus "have/has been to"

    Quote Originally Posted by 900145163 View Post
    Hi !

    My name is Ehsan. I’m from Iran . I have been in united state [sic] since 2011 . I have started to study English since when I came to united state. I have learned lot of thing since I came to united state. In the beginning when I came in united state I wasn’t able to speak English but now I know how to speak English which is very good for me. I have been working at fry’s electronics in Roseville for 1year and couple month . I am very happy because when I came to united state I started very strong. Overall, if you have something in reply with me , you are welcome to be my friends. I’ll be glad to share my experience with you !
    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...roduction.html
    Then ...

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    She's gone to Japan. She is in Japan now.
    She's been to Japan. She has visited Japan in the past, but she is not there now.
    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...been-gone.html
    Quote Originally Posted by Tdol View Post
    Re: Been to London? or Been in London?
    to London- movement, travelling
    in London- location
    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/an...en-london.html

    "Since" here works as an adverb and means "from that time till now".
    More: * i have, since, been+ v.(ing)?

    The usage of since at the end of sentence tells us that the person still lives in the United States of America. While "have been to" as 5jj said that "She has been to Japan" means she no longer there. I checked Google and found ( Common Mistakes in English - Has gone to vs. Has been to). After initial research, I think the prepositions play an important role. Also, the word since can't be used with "have been to."

    To sum it up, when I see the preposition to after "have been," it means that the action has been completed. On the other hand, the preposition in gives us a clear-cut answer that the action is still happening. Am I right? Will you clear it up please?
    Last edited by Odessa Dawn; 31-Jan-2013 at 11:08.

  2. 5jj's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "have/has been in" versus "have/has been to"

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post
    To sum it up, when I see the preposition to after "have been," it means that the action has been completed. On the other hand, the preposition in gives us a clear-cut answer that the action is still happening. Am I right? Will you clear it up please?
    As is so often the case in English, Context is everything.

    A. I haven't seen you for a long time George. What have you been up to?
    B: I've been in Scotland. I had a short-term contract on an oil rig.


    In that sentence, 'in' is perfectly acceptable. The situation is clearly completed.

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