Results 1 to 6 of 6
  1. saloom2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt

    • Join Date: Jan 2013
    • Posts: 319
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #1

    Cool Try [to = Inf.] or [ing]?

    Hello everyone,

    I had tried playing football before the tuition.

    I had tried to play football before the tuition.

    which one is correct and why? and If both are correct, what is the difference?

  2. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,167
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #2

    Re: Try [to = Inf.] or [ing]?

    Quote Originally Posted by saloom2 View Post
    I had tried playing football before the tuitionlesson/tutorial.

    I had tried to play football before the tuitionlesson/tutorial.
    In the first, the speaker had actually played football (to see what the result was.)

    In the second, the speaker had attempted to play football. S/he had probably not actually played; only context will make this absolutely clear.

  3. saloom2's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Student or Learner
      • Native Language:
      • Arabic
      • Home Country:
      • Egypt
      • Current Location:
      • Egypt

    • Join Date: Jan 2013
    • Posts: 319
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #3

    Re: Try [to = Inf.] or [ing]?

    well, I understand the second one now, but I don't actually understand the first one. If he had already played, why would we have added tried? we should have said I had played without try? Right? Could you make it a little bit clearer, please?

  4. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,167
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #4

    Re: Try [to = Inf.] or [ing]?

    If you try doing something, you do it to see if the situation changes. Compare:

    Situation: The room was stuffy.

    1. I tried opening the window, but it made no difference. - I opened the window to see if that would make the room less stuffy. It didn't.

    2. I tried to open the window, but it was stuck. - My attempts to open the window were not successful. I did not manage to open the window.

    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • Japanese
      • Home Country:
      • Japan
      • Current Location:
      • Japan

    • Join Date: Feb 2013
    • Posts: 101
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #5

    Re: Try [to = Inf.] or [ing]?

    Excuse my curiosity.

    Does "I tried opening the window." mean the speaker wanted something to occur by opening the window? If so, the sentence below would be unidiomatic, wouldn't it?

    Before taking the football class, you should try playing football a bit to see if you are interested in it.

    In this context, try doing is used to mean to perform it actually but only in a short time or just a little bit to see whether it does good or bad.

    I wonder if this interpretation is correct or not.

    Thanks in advance.

  5. 5jj's Avatar
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic

    • Join Date: Oct 2010
    • Posts: 28,167
    • Post Thanks / Like
    #6

    Re: Try [to = Inf.] or [ing]?

    Quote Originally Posted by taked4700 View Post
    Excuse my curiosity.

    Does "I tried opening the window." mean the speaker wanted something to occur by opening the window? If so, the sentence below would be unidiomatic, wouldn't it?

    Before taking the football class, you should try playing football a bit to see if you are interested in it.

    In this context, try doing is used to mean to perform it actually but only in a short time or just a little bit to see whether it does good or bad.

    I wonder if this interpretation is correct or not.
    Your sentence is fine. 'Try doing' does not necessarily mean that you should do it only for a short time.

Similar Threads

  1. gerund inf.
    By aysaa in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 13-Sep-2012, 22:50
  2. can't but + inf" and "can't help + ing"
    By allthewayanime in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 28-Dec-2011, 20:32
  3. [General] ing- and Inf. forms
    By vil in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 05-Dec-2010, 10:22
  4. [Grammar] what is the difference between 'adj+to-inf.' and 'adj+ v-ing'
    By wawa97 in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 29-Jun-2009, 04:55
  5. prone to ing/inf
    By micaelo in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 19-Sep-2007, 12:10

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •