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  1. #1
    taked4700 is offline Member
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    Smile be sure of doing

    Hi,

    Is this idiomatic?

    He is sure of arriving there tomorrow, but he doesn't want to go there on time.

    I guess it's more idiomatic to say, "He's sure that he arrives there tomorrow,but he doesn't want to go there on time."

    Is this right?

    Thanks in advance.
    Last edited by taked4700; 08-Feb-2013 at 03:49.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: be sure of doing

    It doesn't make any sense. To "get somewhere on time" means to arrive at the time you were asked to or at the time you are expected. Why does the person not want to arrive on time? It is rather rude to be late.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    The Exalted Father is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: be sure of doing

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    It doesn't make any sense. To "get somewhere on time" means to arrive at the time you were asked to or at the time you are expected. Why does the person not want to arrive on time? It is rather rude to be late.
    I have checked different dictionaries to find out the exact usage and meaning of the word rather, but unfortunately I couldn't understand it.


    Could you please provide me some sort of reliable explanation?

  4. #4
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: be sure of doing

    Quote Originally Posted by taked4700 View Post
    Hi,

    Is this idiomatic?

    He is sure of arriving there tomorrow, but he doesn't want to go there on time.

    I guess it's more idiomatic to say, "He's sure that he arrives there tomorrow,but he doesn't want to go there on time."

    Is this right?

    Thanks in advance.
    "He'll certainly be there tomorrow, but he'll be late." Say this if you are telling someone whether he'll be there.
    "He says he's certain to be there, but that he doesn't want to arrive on time." Say this if you want to tell someone what he thinks. Normally, this wouldn't be warranted, and he might not thank you for passing on his thoughts.

  5. #5
    taked4700 is offline Member
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    Default Re: be sure of doing

    Thank you, Emsr2d2, The Exalted Father and Raymotto.

    I'm sorry for causing misunderstanding.

    I wanted to check the difference between "be sure of doing" and "be sure of having done".
    I'd just like to know if you use "be sure of doing" in order to mean the future action because someone told me that "be sure of doing" indicates taht you are sure that you did something in the past, in other words, you are sure of having done something.

    If I could ask you a fover, could you tell me that if you use "be sure of arriving there" to mean that you are sure that you arrive there and whether it is idiomatic or not?

    Thanks in advance.

  6. #6
    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: be sure of doing

    Quote Originally Posted by taked4700 View Post
    Thank you, Emsr2d2, The Exalted Father and Raymotto.

    I'm sorry for causing misunderstanding.

    I wanted to check the difference between "be sure of doing" and "be sure of having done".
    I'd just like to know if you use "be sure of doing" in order to mean the future action because someone told me that "be sure of doing" indicates taht you are sure that you did something in the past, in other words, you are sure of having done something.

    If I could ask you a fover, could you tell me that if you use "be sure of arriving there" to mean that you are sure that you arrive there and whether it is idiomatic or not?

    Thanks in advance.
    You're not getting the answer you want because your grammar is wrong.
    You can't say, "I am sure that I arrive." You say, "I'm sure that I will arrive."

    "Be sure of doing" is not a common phrase.
    You can say:
    "I am sure I was there yesterday."
    "I'm sure that I'm here now."
    "I'm sure that I'll be there tomorrow."
    "I'm sure of having been there at some time in past."
    "I'm sure that I will arrive on time."
    "I'm sure that I will have arrived by ten o'clock."

    NOT *"I'm sure of being there tomorrow".
    NOT *"I'm sure of having arrived there tomorrow."

  7. #7
    taked4700 is offline Member
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    Default Re: be sure of doing

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    You're not getting the answer you want because your grammar is wrong.
    You can't say, "I am sure that I arrive." You say, "I'm sure that I will arrive."

    "Be sure of doing" is not a common phrase.
    You can say:
    "I am sure I was there yesterday."
    "I'm sure that I'm here now."
    "I'm sure that I'll be there tomorrow."
    "I'm sure of having been there at some time in past."
    "I'm sure that I will arrive on time."
    "I'm sure that I will have arrived by ten o'clock."

    NOT *"I'm sure of being there tomorrow".
    NOT *"I'm sure of having arrived there tomorrow."

    Thank you, Raymott.

    I know that "I'm sure that I will arrive." is idiomatic and grammatical but I guess that "I am sure that I arrive." is at least grammatical and is used frequently. Maybe 'arrive' is rather formal and apt to mean not-near future, but I guess it could be used to mean behaviors in the near future like "I arrive home within ten minutes." Do you say this use of 'arrive' is not grammatical?

    I looked up my dictionary, Cambridge International Dictionary of English, and that says "Are you sure that the film is on tonight?" as one of example sentences.

    I wish you would help me to solve this confusion of mine.

    I would also like to ask you whether sentences below are idiomatic or not.

    1. He was sure of arriving there on time Sunday last week. ( to mean that he arrived there on time Sunday last week. )

    2. He was sure of arriving there on time. ( no references to when his arrival occurred/occurs. )

    Thanks in advance.

  8. #8
    tedtmc is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: be sure of doing

    1. He was sure of (who?) arriving there on time Sunday last week.
    The sentence is not complete without the subject. Same for #2.

    not a teacher

  9. #9
    taked4700 is offline Member
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    Default Re: be sure of doing

    Quote Originally Posted by tedtmc View Post
    The sentence is not complete without the subject. Same for #2.

    not a teacher
    Thank you, Tedtmc.

    I think it is normal and idiomatic not to specify the subject of the gerund.

    You could see the example sentences below in the page at the link sure adjective - definition in British English Dictionary & Thesaurus - Cambridge Dictionary Online
    We arrived early, to be sure of getting a good seat.
    A majority of Congress members wanted to put off an election until they could be sure of winning it.

    And Raymott also wrote "I'm sure of having been there at some time in past."
    He does not put a subject word before 'having been there'.

    What do you say to this?

    Thanks in advance.

  10. #10
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: be sure of doing

    Quote Originally Posted by taked4700 View Post
    I know that "I'm sure that I will arrive." is idiomatic and grammatical but I guess that "I am sure that I arrive." is at least grammatical and is used frequently.
    No
    Maybe 'arrive' is rather formal and apt to mean not-near future, but I guess it could be used to mean behaviors situations in the near future like "I arrive home within ten minutes." Do you say this use of 'arrive' is not grammatical?
    You can say, "I am sure that the bus arrives in ten minutes", because you are expressing your certainty about a scheduled occurrence. If you are sitting on the bus and calling a friend who is waiting for you, it is possible to say, "I arrive in ten minutes". However, it is difficult to think of contexts in which, "I am sure I arrive in ten minutes" is natural.
    I looked up my dictionary, Cambridge International Dictionary of English, and that says "Are you sure that the film is on tonight?" as one of example sentences.
    Fine - the speaker is asking whether this is scheduled.
    I wish you would help me to solve this confusion of mine.
    People are trying, but you are asking about several different issues here. Try to stick to one point at a time.
    I would also like to ask you whether the sentences below are idiomatic or not.

    1. He was sure of arriving there on time Sunday last week. ( to mean that he arrived there on time Sunday last week. )
    It's unlikely.
    2. He was sure of arriving there on time. ( no references to when his arrival occurred/occurs. )
    That is most likely to be said of a future arrival.

    Do not leave a space after the '( 'or before the ')' bracket symbols.

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