Results 1 to 10 of 10
  1. #1
    JACEK1 is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    481
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default His mother was prepared for him to die.

    Hello everybody!

    I am glad to have a new group of the forum members to talk to and exchange opinions with.

    This is my question.

    Does "His mother was prepared for him to die" mean the same as "His mother was prepared that he would die?"

    The source: A sentence said by a woman on BBC World Service's programme about Syria.
    Last edited by JACEK1; 10-Feb-2013 at 16:32. Reason: I forgot to attach it, as usual.

  2. #2
    Barb_D's Avatar
    Barb_D is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Other
      • Native Language:
      • American English
      • Home Country:
      • United States
      • Current Location:
      • United States
    Join Date
    Mar 2007
    Posts
    17,344
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: His mother was prepared for him to die.

    Welcome to Using English.
    Thank you for giving your thread a good title, and for using proper English in asking your question.

    "His mother was prepared that he would die" - this is not a natural statement.

    His mother was prepared (knew it might happen and was ready for it) for his death.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  3. #3
    JACEK1 is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    481
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: His mother was prepared for him to die.

    Thank you for a quick reply.
    Does it mean that "His mother was prepared for him to die" is wrong and should be replaced by "His mother was prepared (knew it might happen and was ready for it) for his death"?

  4. #4
    JACEK1 is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    481
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: His mother was prepared for him to die.

    A reply to post 3 would be very appreciated.

  5. #5
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,758
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: His mother was prepared for him to die.

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Thank you for a quick reply.
    Does it mean that "His mother was prepared for him to die" is wrong and should be replaced by "His mother was prepared (knew it might happen and was ready for it) for his death"?
    No, Barb's answer is an explanation of the meaning. "His mother was prepared for him to die" is not wrong.

  6. #6
    JACEK1 is offline Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Interested in Language
      • Native Language:
      • Polish
      • Home Country:
      • Poland
      • Current Location:
      • Poland
    Join Date
    Feb 2013
    Posts
    481
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: His mother was prepared for him to die.

    Would a native speaker of English say "His mother was prepared for him to die" in everyday situations?

  7. #7
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: His mother was prepared for him to die.

    Quote Originally Posted by JACEK1 View Post
    Would a native speaker of English say "His mother was prepared for him to die" in everyday situations?
    No. Like Barb, I'd probably say, "His mother was prepared (knew it might happen and was ready for it) for his death". I might say "His mother was prepared for him to die" if I knew that his mother was sending him off to fight for his cause - not an everyday situation for most mothers that I know.

  8. #8
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Academic
      • Native Language:
      • English
      • Home Country:
      • Australia
      • Current Location:
      • Australia
    Join Date
    Jun 2008
    Posts
    19,758
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: His mother was prepared for him to die.

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    No. Like Barb, I'd probably say, "His mother was prepared (knew it might happen and was ready for it) for his death". I might say "His mother was prepared for him to die" if I knew that his mother was sending him off to fight for his cause - not an everyday situation for most mothers that I know.
    Hmm, I can't really accept that a native speaker would say that sentence.
    "His mother was prepared for his death." - fine
    "His mother was prepared (knew it might happen and was ready for it) for his death." - It would be extremely unlikely for someone to say this in AusE. Its use would be confined to a written explanation of the meaning of the original questionable sentence, rather than as a more natural statement of that sentence. I could have sworn Barb was using it as an explanation rather than as a better alternative.

  9. #9
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • UK
      • Current Location:
      • UK
    Join Date
    Jul 2009
    Posts
    23,502
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: His mother was prepared for him to die.

    Not that I ever expect to find myself in that situation, I imagine I would say:

    His mother was prepared for his death.
    His mother was prepared for the possibility that he might die.

    The first seems more relevant for someone who, perhaps, has a terminal illness and whose mother has come to terms with the fact that he is certainly going to die before one would have expected.
    The second would be appropriate for a mother whose son was heading off to war.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  10. #10
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
    • Member Info
      • Member Type:
      • Retired English Teacher
      • Native Language:
      • British English
      • Home Country:
      • England
      • Current Location:
      • Czech Republic
    Join Date
    Oct 2010
    Posts
    28,167
    Post Thanks / Like

    Default Re: His mother was prepared for him to die.

    In one real-life situation, I was half-prepared for my son ... to be dead when I arrived / ... to have died before I arrived.

    Fortunately, he survived.

Similar Threads

  1. [Grammar] Prepared for sth + -ing, or prepared for sth + to infinite
    By Kankalin in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 1
    Last Post: 17-Jul-2012, 18:05
  2. mother nature vs mother earth
    By Over the top in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 5
    Last Post: 03-Apr-2012, 14:53
  3. den mother, room mother, block mother.
    By Ju in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 9
    Last Post: 29-Jul-2011, 09:22
  4. birth mother= real mother?
    By keannu in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 6
    Last Post: 19-May-2011, 16:43
  5. 'die from' or 'die of'
    By abdmlkbd in forum Ask a Teacher
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 20-Nov-2008, 11:48

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •