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  1. #1
    notletrest is offline Senior Member
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    Default especially is he /did shakespeare

    Are these acceptable?
    Newton is a mathematician; especially is he a physicist.
    Shakespeare wrote a lot of peoms; especially had Shakespeare written many tragedies. If not , please give me an example each.
    Thanks a lot!

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: especially is he /did shakespeare

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    Are these acceptable?
    Newton is a mathematician; especially is he a physicist.
    Shakespeare wrote a lot of peoms; especially had Shakespeare written many tragedies. If not , please give me an example each.
    Thanks a lot!
    No, they are not acceptable.
    "Isaac newton was a mathemetician and physicist."
    "Shakespeare wrote tragedies, comedies and sonnets."

  3. #3
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: especially is he /did shakespeare

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    Are these acceptable?
    Newton is a mathematician; especially is he a physicist.
    Shakespeare wrote a lot of peoms; especially had Shakespeare written many tragedies. If not , please give me an example each.
    Thanks a lot!
    With the first, you might have meant "specifically", not "especially":

    My father is a scientist - more specifically, he is a chemist.



    With the first, a case might be made for "particularly" although it would lead to a slightly untrue statement:

    Shakespeare wrote a lot of plays, particularly tragedies.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  4. #4
    notletrest is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: especially is he /did shakespeare

    My real end is to hope for 2 sentences with "espeacially +operational verb (be, or do)+ subject +..."Because I came across "yet, rather, especially may be at the beginning of sentences and followed by operational verb + subject +..." ,as for especially , the author didn't give any examples. I tried to make the original sentences to ask for your guidance.
    Thanks!
    Last edited by notletrest; 14-Feb-2013 at 06:25. Reason: correction

  5. #5
    5jj's Avatar
    5jj is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: especially is he /did shakespeare

    I would regard that advice as suspect. Where did you find it?

    I have just skimmed through the first 200 COCA citations for 'especially' and found only three: Especially for students who ... , Especially since the landmark work of ... , and Especially being a non profit doing conservation work. In all three of these, I would have used a comma, not a full stop, before 'especially'. I haven't the time to search the 'yet' and 'rather' citations.

  6. #6
    notletrest is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: especially is he /did shakespeare

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    I would regard that advice as suspect. Where did you find it?

    I have just skimmed through the first 200 COCA citations for 'especially' and found only three: Especially for students who ... , Especially since the landmark work of ... , and Especially being a non profit doing conservation work. In all three of these, I would have used a comma, not a full stop, before 'especially'. I haven't the time to search the 'yet' and 'rather' citations.
    Looking at the learned, wise, beloved, diligently working old photo of 5jj am I, naturally does a respectful feeling come to my mind.
    In the Journal of Foreign Languages sponsored by the Shanghai Foreign Languages Institution No.1985.5.p.52,there is such a paragraph:
    “H. W. Fowler gave a kind of linking inversion, which appeared in clauses beginning with yet, especially, rather, etc.(1965:300) ,and the pattern is mainly in CVS, for example,
    His works were burnt by the common hangman; yet was the multitude still true to him.
    His book is not a biography in the ordinary sense; rather is it a series of recollections… “

    Thanks a lot!

  7. #7
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: especially is he /did shakespeare

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    “H. W. Fowler gave a kind of linking inversion, which appeared in clauses beginning with yet, especially, rather, etc.(1965:300) ,and the pattern is mainly in CVS, for example,
    His works were burnt by the common hangman; yet was the multitude still true to him.
    The words in red were written by Thomas Macaulay (died 1859), and cited by Fowler when he was writing his Dictionary of Modern English Usage in 1923. We should not use them as a guide to 21st Century English usage.

  8. #8
    notletrest is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: especially is he /did shakespeare

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post
    We should not use them as a guide to 21st Century English usage.
    We ,Chinese, are used to esteeming the past over the present. The past expressing methods in language are not wrong today, let alone pointed out by H.W. Fowler. My reference books being too limited, I asked you to help me with it.
    By the way, I should use "Looking at the learned, wise, beloved, diligently working old man photo of 5jj am I" instead of my last one.
    Thanks!

  9. #9
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: especially is he /did shakespeare

    Quote Originally Posted by notletrest View Post
    We ,Chinese, are used to esteeming the past over the present. The past expressing methods in language are not wrong today, let alone pointed out by H.W. Fowler. My reference books being too limited, I asked you to help me with it.
    By the way, I should use "Looking at the learned, wise, beloved, diligently working old man photo of 5jj am I" instead of my last one.
    Thanks!
    You may well be used to respecting the past over the present but when it comes to spoken and written English, if you wish to be understood, you need to learn 21st century English.

    If you want to write historical novels or poetry, then getting to grips with flowery, overly wordy constructions and vocabulary is fine, but don't expect to use them in everyday life.

    Your sentence beginning "Looking at the learned ..." is extremely flowery and, whilst I'm sure it was meant as a compliment and I'm sure 5jj took it as such, it is entirely unnecessary. It is not a good use of your time writing sentences like that and not really a good use of our time reading them. Keep your posts short and to the point. Just say what you need to know, give the words or phrases you are having trouble with, and say something like "Please can you help me with this". We don't stand on ceremony around here - we don't have the time.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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