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Thread: With vs From

  1. #1
    toloue_man is offline Member
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    Default With vs From

    Of the following sentences, which one is correct?

    I took Linguitics with Mr.Smith
    I took Linguitics from Mr.Smith

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
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    Default Re: With vs From

    Quote Originally Posted by toloue_man View Post
    Of the following sentences, which one is correct?

    I took Linguitics with Mr.Smith
    I took Linguitics from Mr.Smith
    "I took Linguistics with Mr.Smith."

  3. #3
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: With vs From

    I think they have two different meaning. "With" means he was a fellow student. "From" means he was the teacher.

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    Default Re: With vs From

    In British English, '... with Mr Smith' could mean a teacher or a student; context would usually make the meaning clear. '... from Mr Smith' is unnatural.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  5. #5
    toloue_man is offline Member
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    Default Re: With vs From

    There are different answers so I'm in doubt which the right answer is.

  6. #6
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    Default Re: With vs From

    Quote Originally Posted by toloue_man View Post
    There are different answers so I'm in doubt which the right answer is.
    SoothingDave is a speaker of American English; I am a speaker of British English. There are areas of usage in which the two varieties differ; this is one of them. If the variety you are learning is BrE, stick with my answer; if it's AmE, stick with Dave's.

    In any case, context will normally make the difference clear, even if you choose a preposition that sounds a little strange to your listener. If you are worried about this, change the structure: 'Mr Smith taught me French'; 'Charlie Smith was in my French class at college'.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


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