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Thread: "Ain't no"

  1. Odessa Dawn's Avatar
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    #1

    "Ain't no"



    Ain't no sense worryin' about the things you got control over, 'cause if you got control over 'em, ain't no sense worryin'. And ain't no sense worryin' about the things you don't got control over, 'cause if you don't got control over 'em, ain't no sense worryin'.”
    More: WORRY -- QUENCH THIS FIERY DART -- Sermon By Pastor David Jeremiah - YouTube

    Why does Pastor David Jeremiah pronounce "Ain't no" /eɪnoʊ/? I know it is difficult for me to pronounce it /eɪntnoʊ/. Do we have a rule in which the sound /t/ can be dropped when it is followed by the
    sound /n/ ? Yes, it is "Not standard." But Pastor David used it. So, I have to be familiar with.

    Definition of ain't | Collins English Dictionary

  2. Raymott's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: "Ain't no"

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post


    Ain't no sense worryin' about the things you got control over, 'cause if you got control over 'em, ain't no sense worryin'. And ain't no sense worryin' about the things you don't got control over, 'cause if you don't got control over 'em, ain't no sense worryin'.”
    More: WORRY -- QUENCH THIS FIERY DART -- Sermon By Pastor David Jeremiah - YouTube

    Why does Pastor David Jeremiah pronounce "Ain't no" /eɪnoʊ/? I know it is difficult for me to pronounce it /eɪntnoʊ/. Do we have a rule in which the sound /t/ can be dropped when it is followed by the
    sound /n/ ? Yes, it is "Not standard." But Pastor David used it. So, I have to be familiar with.

    Definition of ain't | Collins English Dictionary
    Because he's quoting a sportsman (Mickey Rivers, an outfielder for the Texas Rangers) and half trying to emulate his accent.
    The real question might be, "Why does Mickey Rivers speak like that?".


    Mickey Rivers - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

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    #3

    Re: "Ain't no"

    Maybe it's a BrE pronunciation, but I'd probably stick a glottal in rather than eliminating the whole sound.

  3. BobK's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: "Ain't no"

    So would I, but in the song 'Ain' no sunshine when she's gone' there doesn't seem to be one (unless a Br English puts one there )

    b

  4. BobK's Avatar
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    #5

    Re: "Ain't no"

    I was thinking that it might be an African-American thing, but Dylan does it too: 'It ain' no use to sit 'n' wonder why Babe...'. (In Peter Paul and Mary's cover they put the T back. I guess Dylan came from the other side of the tracks ).

    b

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    #6

    Re: "Ain't no"

    You find this dropping of the /t/, or rather, it's conversion into a glottal stop, in more common forms as well. "Can't," for example, is usually pronounced with a glottal stop and not a /t/. This can be confusing to non-native speakers when they get out of the classroom and don't hear a distinct /t/ sound. Sometimes they can hear no difference between "can" and "can't." In teaching pronunciation or diction, it is often more useful to explain the sound as a glottal stop rather than as a t.

    Stephanie
    Last edited by 5jj; 27-Feb-2013 at 19:58. Reason: ad link deleted

  5. BobK's Avatar
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    #7

    Re: "Ain't no"

    And, especially in the can/can't case, this causes a difficulty for speakers of Br English (who use the vowel sound as the prime distinguisher: /ć/ => positive, /a:/ => negative) when listening to a speaker of Am English - who uses the positive-sounding (to us) vowel sound in both cases.

    b

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    #8

    Re: "Ain't no"

    These types of "T's" disappear in the spoken language in many cases in my dialect - and many other American ones. For instance, a supermarket chain here is called "Giant Eagle," but you'll never hear the "t" pronounced by any locals.

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    #9

    Re: "Ain't no"

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    These types of "T's" disappear in the spoken language in many cases in my dialect - and many other American ones. For instance, a supermarket chain here is called "Giant Eagle," but you'll never hear the "t" pronounced by any locals.
    Perhaps, but you're not saying that that is Pastor Jeremiah's natural dialect are you?

  7. probus's Avatar
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    #10

    Re: "Ain't no"

    Quote Originally Posted by Raymott View Post
    Perhaps, but you're not saying that that is Pastor Jeremiah's natural dialect are you?
    What an excellent question. No doubt Soothing Dave is right about the accents he hears, but I also wondered to what extent the pastor's accent was real.

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