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  1. #1
    Odessa Dawn's Avatar
    Odessa Dawn is offline Senior Member
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    Default "It is often" and "I often am"

    Re: How to use the adverb of frequency" always"
    When it used with the continuous form, it is often to show that the speaker disapproves of the action.
    He always calls his mother. (good or neutral)
    He's always calling me. (I wish he'd stop)

    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/te...cy-always.html


    Re: easy for me vs easy to me.

    ********** NOT A TEACHER **********

    Hello, Mr. McKane.

    (1) These two prepositions also confuse native speakers.

    (2) I often am not sure which one to use in a sentence.

    (3) I want to share something I read on the Web:

    To me, golf is a pointless game (= something like a game that is a waste

    of time). (If you like golf, do not be angry with me. This is only an

    example!!!)

    For me, golf is a pointless game.

    The poster said that those two sentences mean the same.

    The important thing that I learned is that maybe:

    To me is an ellipsis (deleting some words) of It seems to me.

    For me is an ellipsis of
    As for me.
    http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...s-easy-me.html - post # 5

    Why is the adverb "Often" in the first quote come after the verb to be (is), and before the verb to be (am) in the second quote? I know that they are correctly used, but when I see that "Often" is used between the pronoun I and verb to be "Am" I start asking myself, why do we put "Often" before the verb to be "Am." Will you clear it up please?

    P.S.:Please note that I am less than zero when it comes to English language. As a result, I failed to search Google in which I could understand this rule, besides saving your time and energy.


  2. #2
    Chicken Sandwich's Avatar
    Chicken Sandwich is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: "It is often" and "I often am"

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post
    Why is the adverb "Often" in the first quote come after the verb to be (is), and before the verb to be (am) in the second quote? I know that they are correctly used, but when I see that "Often" is used between the pronoun I and verb to be "Am" I start asking myself, why do we put "Often" before the verb to be "Am." Will you clear it up please?
    Because we can? I would probably say "I am often not sure..." but as you may know, adverbs are pretty flexible parts of speech in terms of placement in the sentence. There are several options:

    - I am often not sure...
    - I often am not sure...
    - Often I am not sure...

    Quote Originally Posted by Odessa Dawn View Post
    P.S.:Please note that I am less than zero when it comes to English language.
    Please don't apologize for your level of English.
    I am not a teacher.

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