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Thread: hand-cooking

  1. #1
    atabitaraf is offline Senior Member
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    Default hand-cooking

    The way someone cooks is called 'handcooking' in Farsi, Do you have any equivalent in English?
    For example we say my mom has a great hand-cooking.
    Or you may say she has a good hand in cooking.
    What do you say to convey this meaning? Do you have something more special than 'She cooks well'?

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: hand-cooking

    What type of cooking is "handcooking"? Does it mean that she cooks meals by just using the basic ingredients, instead of buying any pre-prepared parts of the meal?
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    atabitaraf is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: hand-cooking

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    What type of cooking is "handcooking"? Does it mean that she cooks meals by just using the basic ingredients, instead of buying any pre-prepared parts of the meal?
    The general skill you have in cooking is your 'hand-cooking'
    'She has a good hand-cooking' means 'she cooks well.'

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: hand-cooking

    If it is just the person's general talent in cooking then no, we don't have a specific word. "She is a good [all-round] cook". Using "all-round" means that she is good at lots of different types of cooking, not one speciality.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  5. #5
    atabitaraf is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: hand-cooking

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    If it is just the person's general talent in cooking then no, we don't have a specific word. "She is a good [all-round] cook". Using "all-round" means that she is good at lots of different types of cooking, not one speciality.
    I happened to find 'cookery' can it be used in my sentence?
    She has a nice cookery.
    I love her cookery.

  6. #6
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: hand-cooking

    Quote Originally Posted by atabitaraf View Post
    I happened to find 'cookery' can it be used in my sentence?
    She has a nice cookery.
    I love her cookery. although it's not very natural.
    "Cookery" is uncountable so your first suggestion is incorrect. The second is possible but you are more likely to hear "I love her cooking".

    We use "cookery" but normally with an adjective in front of it, describing the type of cuisine. "Yesterday, I had a North Indian cookery lesson at a local college" = "Yesterday, I went to a college and someone taught me how to make typical North Indian food".
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  7. #7
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: hand-cooking

    The term 'hand-cooked' is used, but it is used to refer to cookery in the home ('home-cooked' is also used) as opposed to cooking on an industrial scale (with vats instead of bowls).

    b

  8. #8
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    Default Re: hand-cooking

    FYI: Americans use "cooking" in the "cookery" examples above. I expect most people would understand it, especially in the context given.
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

  9. #9
    BobK's Avatar
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    Default Re: hand-cooking

    I'd probably use 'cooking' here too. And in the fixed phrase 'home cooking' cookery doesn't seem to me to be an option.

    b

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