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  1. #1
    jc.analyst is offline Newbie
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    Question The word anxiety is derived from the Latin "anxietas"

    1) The word anxiety is derived from the Latin "anxietas"
    2) The word anxiety is derived from Latin "anxietas"
    Which is the right sentence? pls help.

  2. #2
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: The word anxiety is derived from the Latin "anxietas"

    #1 would be correct if you ended it with a period.

  3. #3
    JMurray is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: The word anxiety is derived from the Latin "anxietas"

    not a teacher

    (1) is correct: The word anxiety is derived from the Latin "anxietas".
    Some people may decide not to use the quote marks.

  4. #4
    jc.analyst is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: The word anxiety is derived from the Latin "anxietas"

    Quote Originally Posted by SoothingDave View Post
    #1 would be correct if you ended it with a period.
    Thanks.

    Does the period make any difference? For example, is it right to write as below?

    The word anxiety is derived from the Latin "anxietas", meaning, to choke or throttle.

  5. #5
    probus's Avatar
    probus is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: The word anxiety is derived from the Latin "anxietas"

    The period makes a difference, in that we end every sentence with a full stop.

    (How's that for marrying BrE with AmE?)

    I can't remember what the Latin anxietas means, but it is a nominative plural noun, not a verb. To choke or throttle, my foot. Probably anxietas means worries.
    Last edited by probus; 21-Feb-2013 at 06:36.

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