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  1. #1
    keannu's Avatar
    keannu is offline Key Member
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    Default fine features unbeautified by sentiment or good nature

    Does this underlined mean two types of persons like "a handsome figure without character," and "a figure with fine features unbeautified by sentiment or good nature"? or just one person?
    I think "character, fine features" part is ambiguous to understand.

    st51)No wise person will marry for beauty mainly...But to marry a handsome figure without character, fine features unbeautified by sentiment or good nature, is the most miserable of mistakes...
    Last edited by keannu; 24-Feb-2013 at 22:07.

  2. #2
    bhaisahab's Avatar
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    Default Re: fine features unbeautified by sentiment or good nature

    Quote Originally Posted by keannu View Post
    Does this underlined mean two types of persons like "a handsome figure without character," and "a figure with fine features unbeautified by sentiment or good nature"? or just one person?
    I think "character, fine features" part is ambiguous to understand.

    st51)No wise person will marry for beauty manly...But to marry a handsome figure without character, fine features unbeautified by sentiment or good nature, is the most miserable of mistakes...
    It means one person.

  3. #3
    JoelTC is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: fine features unbeautified by sentiment or good nature

    Yes, it is ambiguous, but as a professional writer, I can tell you that the majority of literary writers will twist the rules of the English language to make it sound prettier. For example, in the sentence you cited, several words are implied (that is, left out intentionally). They are: "...a handsome figure without character, whose fine features are unbeautified by sentiment or good nature..."

    Hope that helps.

  4. #4
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: fine features unbeautified by sentiment or good nature

    I'm assuming there is a typo somewhere in "No wise person will marry for beauty manly ..."
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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