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Thread: take vs bring

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    #1

    take vs bring

    If I'm writing an invitation to the party I'm organising, I can write:
    Bring your own alcohol.

    If I'm going with my friend to my sister's party, which one is correct:
    I think we should bring our own alcohol to the party.
    or
    I think we should take our own alcohol to the party.

    If I'm giving advice to my friend from different city, I should say:
    You should take your own sandwiches to school instead of eating in the school canteen.

    Would "bring" be a mistake here?
    You should bring your own sandwiches to school instead of eating in the school canteen.

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    #2

    Re: take vs bring

    Quote Originally Posted by angelene001 View Post
    If I'm writing an invitation to the party I'm organising, I can write:
    Bring your own alcohol.

    If I'm going with my friend to my sister's party, which one is correct:
    I think we should bring our own alcohol to the party.
    or
    I think we should take our own alcohol to the party.

    If I'm giving advice to my friend from different city, I should say:
    You should take your own sandwiches to school instead of eating in the school canteen.

    Would "bring" be a mistake here?
    You should bring your own sandwiches to school instead of eating in the school canteen.
    In most cases for future events (as in your examples) either "bring" or "take" may be used. Any difference (as slight as it might be) can be based on whether you want to stress the source of the action or the destination, OR the source of the statement.
    A. I'm having a party on Saturday and I want you to come, but bring your own alcohol. (Focus is on the party/destination.) A. Are you going to Angeline's party on Saturday? B. Sure. A. OK. Don't forget to take your camera. (Focus is on the source location)

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    #3

    Re: take vs bring

    It is entirely down to the place and reference point of the speaker. Keep in mind that 'bring' (in British English) is always 'to here' whereas 'take' is 'to there'.

    So, I am sitting in my classroom in Christchurch right now. All the following sentences are true and accurate:
    • Fabio, don't forget to bring your essay tomorrow. (bring it here)
    • I haven't got my umbrella, I forgot to bring it this morning. (didn't bring it here)
    • If you're going on the trip tomorrow with Mr Jackson, don't forget to take your camera. (take it there)
    • If you're coming with me on the trip tomorrow, don't forget to bring your camera. (bring it to where we will be tomorrow)
    • Shall I take you to the hospital? You look very sick. (take you there)
    • Come on, we have to go. You can bring your sandwiches with you. (bring them with you to where we are going)
    • Could you take my photograph? - NOTHING to do with Bring/Take discussion! :)

  1. 5jj's Avatar
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    #4

    Re: take vs bring

    Quote Originally Posted by robbarron View Post
    It is entirely down to the place and reference point of the speaker. Keep in mind that 'bring' (in British English) is always 'to here' whereas 'take' is 'to there'.
    I agree with most of what you said in your post #3, but I have learnt to avoid the use of 'always'. Here can be the place that the speaker assumes s/he and the addressee will be:

    Fred tells me (that) you are coming/going to Maria's party tomorrow. Will you bring the champagne, or shall I?

    I usually bring/take a box of chocolates when I visit my mother.




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    #5

    Re: take vs bring

    Quote Originally Posted by 5jj View Post


    I usually bring/take a box of chocolates when I visit my mother.

    We'd never say 'Bring' here would be unusual in AusE.

  3. probus's Avatar
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    #6

    Re: take vs bring

    Robbarron wrote: "It is entirely down to the place and reference point of the speaker. Keep in mind that 'bring' (in British English) is always 'to here' whereas 'take' is 'to there'."

    That used to be the case. We took things with us when we went, and brought them with us when we came. But today's generation never takes at all, they only bring. My children regard me with astonishment when I try to tell them this. They are just as sure that I don't know to speak English as I am that they don't.

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    #7

    Re: take vs bring

    i agree with rabboron..

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