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  1. #1
    angelene001 is offline Member
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    Default like to do/ like doing

    Can we use "like to do" and "like doing" interchangeably?

    Where do you like to go on holiday?
    I like to go on a beach holiday in the summer.

  2. #2
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: like to do/ like doing

    Quote Originally Posted by angelene001 View Post
    Can we use "like to do" and "like doing" interchangeably?

    Where do you like to go on holiday?
    I like to go on a beach holiday in the summer.
    Your title and first line question ask about the interchangeability of "like to do" and "like doing".
    Your example sentences use "like to go" and "like going".

    Which one would you like us to deal with?
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #3
    angelene001 is offline Member
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    Default Re: like to do/ like doing

    I'm sorry. I'd like to ask about "like + gerund" and "like + to-infinitive" in general.

    I've always been taught that we use "like + gerund" to talk about things, activities we like.
    I like watching TV.
    We can use "like + to-infinitive" to talk about things which we think are good to do. For example:
    I like to exercise twice a week.

    When I see such an example, I'm confused:
    - Where do you like to go on holiday?
    - I like to go on a beach holiday in the summer.

  4. #4
    Mr_Ben's Avatar
    Mr_Ben is offline Member
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    Default Re: like to do/ like doing

    There isn't really a difference in meaning like with some verbs which can be followed by both gerund and infinitive (such as stop, remember, forget), the difference is more in the context you are describing. I found an old thread with the same question and Tdol puts it well here: http://www.usingenglish.com/forum/as...html#post12058

  5. #5
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    nyota is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: like to do/ like doing

    Consider these:

    1. I don't like to disturb her.
    (I don't want to)
    2. I don't like disturbing her. (which I've done/ I do, I don't enjoy it)
    3. I love skiing/ to ski in the early spring. (which I've done/ I do, I enjoy it)
    4.I prefer staying/ to stay in on cold winter evenings (which I've done/ I do).

    When you use like (or a few other verbs such as prefer, love, hate) with the infinitive, it means you have feelings beforehand about what may happen.* Then the meaning of the verb is (not) want. See example 1.

    *What does happen depends on circuimstances. I don't like to disturb her, and so I'll call her later/ but I'm afraid I must.

    When our feelings accompany or follow what happens (or what we know will happen), so that the meaning is (not) enjoy, these verbs take -ing or the infinitive (when affirmative). See examples 2, 3 and 4.

    Source: H. Gethin, Grammar in Context

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