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  1. #1
    vectrum is offline Newbie
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    Default Another point of confusion.

    I want to say ( kind of a complaint) the following but I don't understand
    how to structure it and I always get confused in saying this kind
    sentence.
    "He never wanted I get a good job"
    "They never wanted I marry a beautiful girl"
    "She always wished I will remain financially unstable for ever so she can control me"

    I always get confused in the second part of the sentences;
    ... I get a.. ( should I say "I got a...")
    ... I marry a.. ( should I say "I married a...")
    ... I will remain... ( should I say "I would remain...")

    What I should use here?

    Also please tell me which part of grammar I need to study to use this kind of sentence correctly.

  2. #2
    Mr_Ben's Avatar
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    Default Re: Another point of confusion.

    You have two different verbs here so let's look at them separately.

    The verb "want" has a very consistent pattern. It can be followed by a noun phrase or a verb phrase (with the verb in the infinitive). So you can make sentences like, "I want a coffee." "I want to visit Australia." When we use the infinitive verb phrase, either we want to do these things ourselves or we want someone else to do them. When we want someone else to do something, we put the object after "want" and before the infinitive. I've done it twice in the last two sentences.

    So here are the possible patterns for the verb "want":

    • I want [noun phrase]. [a new car, some bread, those shoes in the window, etc.]
    • I want [infinitive verb phrase]. [to get rich, to go to NYC, to have a big family, etc.]
    • I want [object] [infinitive verb phrase]. [you, him, her, my brother, the waiter, etc.] [to help me, to bring me a sandwich, etc.]


    These are the only patterns possible with "want," it's not possible to say "I want going" or "he wants I be." All verbs have patterns of structures which follow them (you might notice "help" and "bring" in my last example: they have their own patterns too). I don't have a great resource for students to study these patterns, but I do have a rather technical resource for teachers: here is the section on this pattern of "want", here is the table of contents.


    In the case of wish, please see this excellent guide to the different patterns (and their different meanings) here: Using 'Wish' in English - Articles - UsingEnglish.com

  3. #3
    vectrum is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Another point of confusion.

    Thank you very much.
    What I say the second part of the following statement that I narrate the wishes of someone;
    He never wanted [ I married a good girl]. Should I say "I would marry a .. " or "I married a good girl".
    I get confused while saying the second clause of this kind of sentence.

  4. #4
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    bhaisahab is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: Another point of confusion.

    Quote Originally Posted by vectrum View Post
    Thank you very much.
    What I say the second part of the following statement that I narrate the wishes of someone;
    He never wanted [ I married a good girl]. Should I say "I would marry a .. " or "I married a good girl".
    I get confused while saying the second clause of this kind of sentence.
    You could say, "He never wanted that I should marry a good girl", "He never wanted me to marry a good girl", "He had never wanted me to marry a good girl".

  5. #5
    vectrum is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: Another point of confusion.

    Thank you bhaisahab

    Yes, this is it. "He never wanted [that I should marry a good girl] -- this kind of construct I can't use/make.
    Could you please tell me why "should" is used here? Which part of grammar I need to study to understand
    this kind of usage.

    Thank you very very much.

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