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    roseriver1012's Avatar
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    Question Still, some questions about the infinitive used as the subject.

    1. To be cycling in a sandstorm is frightening. To cycle in a sandstorm is frightening.

    What's the difference between the above two sentences in meaning?

    2. To have been caught in a sandstorm was a terrible experience.

    Having been caught in a sandstorm was a terrible experience.

    Is there a difference between those two sentences in meaning?

    Thanks for your help!

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    Raymott's Avatar
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    Default Re: Still, some questions about the infinitive used as the subject.

    Quote Originally Posted by roseriver1012 View Post
    1. To be cycling in a sandstorm is frightening. To cycle in a sandstorm is frightening.

    What's the difference between the above two sentences in meaning?

    Neither is natural, We'd say, "Cycling in a sandstorm is frightening." But there's no difference.


    2. To have been caught in a sandstorm was a terrible experience.

    Having been caught in a sandstorm was a terrible experience.

    Is there a difference between those two sentences in meaning?
    They are both wrong, unless you have an odd meaning.
    I think you mean "Being caught in a sandstorm was a terrible experience."


    Thanks for your help!
    If you mean the fact of having been caught in a sandstorm at some time in your life was, at some time afterwards, a terrible experience, then your sentences are right.
    Compare: "Having been to Paris was a joyous experience". This doesn't mean you felt joy in Paris (though you probably did); it means you felt joy afterwards because of having been there.

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