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  1. #11
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: “Please accept my apology / apologies”

    In this phrase, it's not the number of acts. I'd use the plural for a single act to sound more sincere.

  2. #12
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    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: “Please accept my apology / apologies”

    Quote Originally Posted by Islands View Post
    I apologized (AmE spelling) to the teacher and to each of her students.
    My apology was not accepted by the teacher. However, my apologies were accepted by her students.
    I don't often correct posts by native speakers but I'm afraid I had to correct this one. The usage of "... teacher, however..." was not grammatical. I would also like to point out that I would not have used that combination of "apology" and "apologies" when referring to the same event. I would have said "I apologised to the teacher and to each of her students. My apology was not accepted by the teacher but it was accepted by the students".

    I was also interested to see that a UK-born British English speaker currently based in Australia used the American spelling (apologized) instead of the BrE "apologised".

    Islands - please don't use ampersands on the site. It's important that the learners use full words unless, as in some company names, an ampersand is required.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  3. #13
    Islands is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: “Please accept my apology / apologies”

    Thank you emsr2d2 for your corrections. I accept that my example wasn't the best. I just wanted to show that 'apologies' can be used in the plural form to mean more than one apology. Perhaps this would have been better: Many of the apologies that we received were from teachers not students. Thinking of them as written apologies may be helpful.

  4. #14
    Tan Elaine is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: “Please accept my apology / apologies”

    Quote Originally Posted by emsr2d2 View Post
    I don't often correct posts by native speakers but I'm afraid I had to correct this one. The usage of "... teacher, however..." was not grammatical. I would also like to point out that I would not have used that combination of "apology" and "apologies" when referring to the same event. I would have said "I apologised to the teacher and to each of her students. My apology was not accepted by the teacher but it was accepted by the students".

    I was also interested to see that a UK-born British English speaker currently based in Australia used the American spelling (apologized) instead of the BrE "apologised".

    Islands - please don't use ampersands on the site. It's important that the learners use full words unless, as in some company names, an ampersand is required.
    "Apologize" can be found in several British English dictionaries. I believe both spellings are now correct in British English.
    Last edited by Tan Elaine; 25-Mar-2013 at 08:35.

  5. #15
    Islands is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: “Please accept my apology / apologies”

    (I am not a teacher)

    Why might an English/Australian (me) spell apologize with a ‘z’ and not an ‘s’?



    I must admit that seeing the word ‘apologize’ (with a ‘z’) used to jar with me. However, it has become familiar over the years and I have come to accept it and sometimes use it too.
    The word that I grew up with ‘apologise’ (with an ‘s’) still sits more comfortably with my eyes. (but not with a red squiggly line under it) If I knew how to configure my computer’s spell checking software so that it doesn’t default to American grammar, I would no doubt use ‘apologize’ less.
    Last edited by Islands; 25-Mar-2013 at 10:36.

  6. #16
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Default Re: “Please accept my apology / apologies”

    Quote Originally Posted by Islands View Post
    Why might an English/Australian (me) spell apologize with a ‘z’ and not an ‘s’?



    I must admit that seeing the word ‘apologize’ (with a ‘z’) used to jar with me. However, it has become familiar over the years and I have come to accept it and sometimes use it too.
    That's the key point for me- I have seen British English speakers use both forms in the same text, the same paragraph even. Also, many of these changes occur- movie was definitely an American word when I was a child, but I happily use it now.

  7. #17
    emsr2d2's Avatar
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    Default Re: “Please accept my apology / apologies”

    I don't find using different words for things an issue. I too use "movie" sometimes, although I use "film" far more often. As we found in another thread recently, many of us use "to quit" instead of "to give up" quite frequently.

    However, for my own part, the sight of an AmE spelling still jumps off the page at me and I can say with almost complete certainty that, unless I'm directly quoting, I have never used the -ize ending and I have no plans to. I still tell students that "-ise" is BrE (and other regional variants) and "-ize" is AmE.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  8. #18
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    BobK is offline Harmless drudge
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    Default Re: “Please accept my apology / apologies”

    Quote Originally Posted by Tan Elaine View Post
    "Apologize" can be found in several British English dictionaries. I believe both spellings are now correct in British English.
    Yes. I use it, and mildly (but only mildly ) resent being told I'm flirting with Americanism when I do.

    I've blogged about this Big-Endian vs Little-Endian dispute* elsewhere.

    b

    * This is a reference to a dispute described in Gulliver's Travels:

    The novel further describes a ... quarrel over the practice of breaking eggs. Traditionally, Lilliputians broke boiled eggs on the larger end; a few generations ago, an Emperor of Lilliput, the Present Emperor's great-grandfather, had decreed that all eggs be broken on the smaller end after he cut himself breaking the egg on the larger end. The differences between Big-Endians (those who broke their eggs at the larger end) and Little-Endians had given rise to "six rebellions... wherein one Emperor lost his life, and another his crown". The Lilliputian religion says an egg should be broken on the convenient end, which is now interpreted by the Lilliputians as the smaller end. The Big-Endians gained favor in Blefuscu.
    See more here.

    b

  9. #19
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    Nehushtan is offline Junior Member
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    Default Re: “Please accept my apology / apologies”

    The use of the spelling -ize rather than -ise in British English is Oxford spelling. See the Wikipedia article on it.
    Last edited by Nehushtan; 25-Mar-2013 at 12:05.
    Holding on to anger is like drinking poison and expecting the other person to die.

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