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  1. #1
    britdam007 is offline Junior Member
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    Default Sentence Meaning

    Lily: Of course, I guess a lobster roll is kind of a lobster in burger form. Itís a sandwich.

    Mason: OK, obviouslyyou and I are down with seafood. Do people give you crap if you crack out a tuna sandwich at work or something?

    Could you please tell me the meaning of the underlined bold phrases in the above dialogue?

  2. #2
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    Grumpy is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Sentence Meaning

    I am too old to be confident about modern idioms, but I would guess that "you and I are down with seafood" means "you and I are familiar with, and like, seafood". Similarly, I assume that to "crack out"​ a tuna sandwich means either to make it or [more likely] to unwrap it.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  3. #3
    SlickVic9000's Avatar
    SlickVic9000 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Sentence Meaning

    (Not a Teacher)

    Have some confidence Grumpy old man! You called it right. "To be down with something" is to like it or agree with it (Ex. A: "Hey, do you want to hit the pool hall after lunch?" B: "I'm down with that, man."). "To crack out" is simply to take something out and use it (Ex. A: "Hey Rick, is your power out, too? B: "Yeah, I was just about to crack out the candles.")

  4. #4
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    Grumpy is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Sentence Meaning

    It works both ways... Sometimes the younger generation get baffled too.
    A couple of years ago, I was teaching a young man to fly. We had covered the main part of the lesson, and were about 30 miles away from base. I wanted him to fly me back to the airfield as quickly as he could, so I said "Home, James; and don't spare the horses!" He looked across the cockpit at me, then raised his dark visor and said, plaintively, "But...Sir.......my name's not James". He had never heard that expression before. I felt about 100!
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  5. #5
    SlickVic9000's Avatar
    SlickVic9000 is offline Senior Member
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    Default Re: Sentence Meaning

    Personally, I'm more familiar with "Over the cliff, James, I wish to commit suicide."

  6. #6
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    Barb_D is online now Moderator
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    Default Re: Sentence Meaning

    Quote Originally Posted by SlickVic9000 View Post
    Personally, I'm more familiar with "Over the cliff, James, I wish to commit suicide."
    Huh??
    I'm not a teacher, but I write for a living. Please don't ask me about 2nd conditionals, but I'm a safe bet for what reads well in (American) English.

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