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Thread: one in ten

  1. #1
    jasonlulu_2000 is offline Senior Member
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    one in ten

    She has one chance in ten!

    Your chances for getting well real soon were ten to one!

    Do the two examples above mean the same! Do they mean the possibility of getting well is 10%?

    Thanks!

    Jason

  2. #2
    Route21's Avatar
    Route21 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: one in ten

    Quote Originally Posted by jasonlulu_2000 View Post
    She has one chance in ten!
    Your chances for getting well real soon were ten to one!
    Do the two examples above mean the same! Do they mean the possibility of getting well is 10%?
    Thanks!
    Jason
    They are somewhat different!
    One chance in ten vs ten chances in eleven.

    Regards
    R21

  3. #3
    Raymott's Avatar
    Raymott is online now VIP Member
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    Re: one in ten

    Quote Originally Posted by jasonlulu_2000 View Post
    She has one chance in ten!

    Your chances for getting well real soon were ten to one!

    Do the two examples above mean the same! Do they mean the possibility of getting well is 10%?

    Thanks!

    Jason
    Some people use "ten to one" as meaning 1 in 10. They're wrong, but you can't escape it.
    "The chances of anything coming from Mars are a million to one, he said." This is supposed to mean that the chances are 1 in 1 million, but in fact it means a million chances of their coming to one chance of their not coming. So, it's a wonder anyone was surprised. They are trying to say "a million to one against anything coming from Mars".

  4. #4
    jasonlulu_2000 is offline Senior Member
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    Re: one in ten

    Quote Originally Posted by Route21 View Post
    They are somewhat different!
    One chance in ten vs ten chances in eleven.

    Regards
    R21
    Why is "ten to one" equal to "ten chances in eleven"?

    So "four to one" is equal to " four chances in five", is it?

    Thanks!

  5. #5
    SoothingDave is offline VIP Member
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    Re: one in ten

    I don't find the use of "ten to one" like this correct at all. If you bet on a horse whose odds are ten-to-one, that means that for every dollar you wager, you win ten if he wins.

    I don't see how that applies to handicapping someone's odds of getting better, other than using long odds (50 to one or "a million to one") to describe a bad situation.

  6. #6
    Tdol is offline Editor, UsingEnglish.com
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    Re: one in ten

    The second sounds like a bet to me, so I wouldn't use it in the context of someone's chances of surviving.

  7. #7
    Grumpy's Avatar
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    Re: one in ten

    Quote Originally Posted by jasonlulu_2000 View Post
    Why is "ten to one" equal to "ten chances in eleven"?

    So "four to one" is equal to " four chances in five", is it?

    Thanks!
    Yes. If the odds are four to one in favour of a particular outcome from an event, then that outcome should occur four times from a total of five events. If the odds are four to one against, then that outcome should occur once from five events.
    I'm not a teacher of English, but I have spoken it for (almost) all of my life....

  8. #8
    Route21's Avatar
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    Re: one in ten

    Quote Originally Posted by Grumpy View Post
    Yes. If the odds are four to one in favour of a particular outcome from an event, then that outcome should occur four times from a total of five events. If the odds are four to one against, then that outcome should occur once from five events.
    See also:
    Fixed-odds betting - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    "Fractional odds:

    Favoured by bookmakers in the United Kingdom and Ireland, and also common in horse racing, fractional odds quote the net total that will be paid out to the bettor, should he win, relative to his stake.

    Odds of 4/1 ("four-to-one" or less commonly "four-to-one*against") would imply that the bettor stands to make a 400 profit on a 100 stake. If the odds are 1/4 (read "one-to-four", or "four-to-one*on"), the bettor will make 25 on a 100 stake. Should he win, the bettor always receives his original stake back, so if the odds are 4/1 the bettor receives a total of 500 (400 plus the original 100).

    Odds of 1/1 are known as evens or even money.

    Not all fractional odds are traditionally read using the lowest common denominator.
    Perhaps most unusual is that odds of 10/3 are read as "one-hundred-to-thirty".

    Fractional odds are also known as British odds, UK odds or in that country, traditional odds."


    R21

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