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Thread: in a bundle

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    #1

    in a bundle

    Can I use "in a bundle" in a technical document? For example...

    If a change is made in the plan, it should be reported every time.
    However, two or more changes may be reported in a bundle in the following cases:

    If not, how should I say it? "Collectively"?

  1. bhaisahab's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: in a bundle

    Quote Originally Posted by pinkie9 View Post
    Can I use "in a bundle" in a technical document? For example...

    If a change is made in the plan, it should be reported every time.
    However, two or more changes may be reported in a bundle in the following cases:

    If not, how should I say it? "Collectively"?
    Use "at the same time" or "together".

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    #3

    Re: in a bundle

    Thank you!
    Why is "in a bundle" wrong here? Because it's colloquial?

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    #4

    Re: in a bundle

    It's just an odd word choice for addressing 2 or 3 issues in a technical paper. Bundles are for things like hay or newspapers (delivered to a newsstand, for example).

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    #5

    Re: in a bundle

    A "bundle" is also the word used for a collection of entertainment services supplied by the same company. For example, Virgin Media supplies cable TV, broadband, mobile phone and landline services in the UK. You can take one service on its own, or put two or more together into a "bundle".

    I currently have cable TV, broadband and my landline as a bundle from one company.
    I get my mobile phone service from a different company.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

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