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    #1

    Smile accuse someone for going to do something in the future

    Hi,


    Is it possible to use 'accuse' for future action?

    He accused me for going to quit the current job nest month.

    Thanks in advance.

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    #2

    Re: accuse someone for going to do something in the future

    This sentence is not possible, but you could say e.g.

    He accused me of planning to quit...

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    #3

    Re: accuse someone for going to do something in the future

    Thank you, Philo.

    Sorry for my using 'for' in place of 'of'. I cannot see why I used 'for' when writing the post No.1.

    So, does this sentence make sense?

    He accused me of going to quit my current job next month.

    I'm wondering if 'of going to' is used in a context like this or not.

    Thanks in advance.

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    #4

    Re: accuse someone for going to do something in the future

    Quote Originally Posted by taked4700 View Post
    Thank you, Philo.

    Sorry for my using 'for' in place of 'of'. I cannot see why I used 'for' when writing the post No.1.

    So, does this sentence make sense?

    He accused me of going to quit my current job next month.

    I'm wondering if 'of going to' is used in a context like this or not.

    Thanks in advance.
    No, you really can't accuse something of something they haven't done yet.
    You can accuse someone of: planning to, intending to, having an intention of doing, wanting to, wishing that ...
    These are all things that are happening in the present but have some intentionality towards the future.
    'going to' doesn't work though.

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    #5

    Re: accuse someone for going to do something in the future

    The construction 'accuse someone of going' is, of course, grammatically possible, but would have quite the wrong meaning: the speaker would be accusing you of having physically gone somewhere in order to quit. It would have no future sense whatsoever.

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