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  1. #11
    Mido Torres is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: I need some answeres to be fluent at British accent !

    I just need a great site for the right Pronunciation

    I mean I wanna hear some people talking this accent

    I need a guaranteed site having a sound dictionary

  2. #12
    Mido Torres is offline Newbie
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    Default Re: I need some answeres to be fluent at British accent !

    Guys,

    What's the difference between ŋ and n at the pronunciation ?

  3. #13
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    Mr_Ben is offline Member
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    Default Re: I need some answeres to be fluent at British accent !

    Quote Originally Posted by Mido Torres View Post
    I just need a great site for the right Pronunciation

    I mean I wanna hear some people talking this accent

    I need a guaranteed site having a sound dictionary
    Anyone who guarantees anything about learning or teaching English is nothing more than a salesman. NOTHING can be guaranteed about learning ANY language (with the exception that you cannot learn without hard work), or there would be no academic debate any longer and everyone would teach the same way. What I'm saying is, don't look for a guaranteed site, look for good sites and choose what works best for you.


    There are many listening (and reading and vocabulary and grammar) activities on BBC Learning English.

    You can hear the difference between ŋ and n by clicking on their symbols on this British Council page (they also have lots of activities).

  4. #14
    Route21's Avatar
    Route21 is offline Senior Member
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    Smile Re: I need some answeres to be fluent at British accent !

    According to Wiki:
    Peter Trudgill estimated in 1974 that only "3% of British people were RP speakers".
    I graduated over 10 years earlier.

    At that time, there weren't enough qualified RP teachers around, maybe even in Southern England, to teach pronunciation as a subject in its own right, even if you studied English at "A" level.

    Shucks! It looks like I'm going to have to make do at my current English pronunciation level and concentrate on learning Thai.

    I've not lived "up North" (Yorkshire/Lancashire) since the early 60's and have had not used RP, as such, in the multinational/multicultural oil/gas/petrochemical industries in the UK or abroad. I try to stick to plain English that most people can understand. As "they" say, a Yorkshireman calls a spade a spade!

    I pronounce "put" & "but" the same way and can't generate an "ng" in "bank" although there's always one in Bangkok. My "in" is the same, whether with London or Cardiff.

    I guess I'll just have to leave phonetics and the like to the specialists.

    My specialities lie elsewhere (including trying to make sense of weekly/monthly reports and complex contractual documents from multinational engineers whose first language isn't plain English).

    Regards
    R21

  5. #15
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    Default Re: I need some answeres to be fluent at British accent !

    Quote Originally Posted by Route21 View Post
    I can't generate an "ng" in "bank" although there's always one in Bangkok. My "in" is the same, whether with London or Cardiff.
    I only just realised this myself, do you not feel the different "n" sounds when pronouncing ban/bane and bank? I was surprised.

    Quote Originally Posted by Route21 View Post
    I guess I'll just have to leave phonetics and the like to the specialists.
    Agreed.

  6. #16
    emsr2d2's Avatar
    emsr2d2 is offline Moderator
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    Default Re: I need some answeres to be fluent at British accent !

    Forvo is a pretty good pronunciation website. However, you need to be aware that people record their pronunciations and those people come from all parts of all countries. Take the word "grass" as an example. On Forvo, you will find several pronunciations by people from the UK. There are at least three completely different pronunciations, one used by people from the south-west, one by people from London, the south-east and a lot of East Anglia, and another used by people from the Midlands and the North. That's before you even start on Irish, Welsh and Scottish pronunciations.
    Remember - correct capitalisation, punctuation and spacing make posts much easier to read.

  7. #17
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: I need some answeres to be fluent at British accent !

    Quote Originally Posted by Route21 View Post
    At that time, there weren't enough qualified RP teachers around, maybe even in Southern England, to teach pronunciation as a subject in its own right, even if you studied English at "A" level.
    Phonetics has been taught at university level since the days of Henry Sweet and Daniel Jones. Pronunciation/Elocution probably has a longer history - think of Pygmalion/My Fair Lady. My present, roughly RP, accent is in part due to the 'how now brown cow' drills (I'm serious!) that began at my prep school in 1954-55
    I've not lived "up North" (Yorkshire/Lancashire) since the early 60's and have had not used RP, as such, in the multinational/multicultural oil/gas/petrochemical industries in the UK or abroad. I try to stick to plain English that most people can understand.
    There are many very successful English (I deliberately use that word rather than 'British') people who do not speak RP, and no serious linguist considers non-RP varieties in any way inferior. It is, however a fact (regrettable in my opinion) that for many years RP and similar southern British 'educated' varieties of English were, within England at least, considered to be a sign of intellectual superiority.

    While listening materials provided with most modern course books do use speakers of other varieties of English, they mostly avoid the 'stronger' dialects, and the bulk of the listening material is roughly 'educated' southern English. As a result, many learners believe that RP and similar varieties are 'standard' British English, and they have genuine difficulties in understanding speakers of other varieties.
    I [...] can't generate an "ng" in "bank" although there's always one in Bangkok. My "in" is the same, whether with London or Cardiff.
    As I can't hear you speak, I'll have to take your word on that, but I have to say that you must be in a tiny minority of native speakers. When I was taking the phonology part of a Cert TESOL course, many of my native-speaker trainees denied emphatically that they used /ŋ/ in 'bank' or 'in Cardiff' (or that they pronounced 'handbag' as /hæmbæg/). Indeed, when they demonstrated the words/phrases to prove their point, they didn't, because they were thinking about what they were saying. I spent some time setting up situations in which they uttered the words without thinking, and eleven fellow trainees and/or my recorder testified that they did produce sounds that they claimed they didn't.

    My primary interest in the English language (as you may have noticed) is in the tense system of English. However, during my time as a teacher trainer, I spent a lot of my spare time on phonetics/phonology - largely because I was appalled at the bilge my trainees were presenting to their students. I have had trainee teachers insist that in an utterance such as 'I think he's coming tomorrow', the h of he's must be clearly produced. Not to produce a clear /h/ is to drop your aitches, a clear sign of lack of education. Sphericals! 95+% of people from England do not produce a clear /h/ in such utterances in normal conversation. I doubt if many speakers of most other varieties of English do either.

    I have to admit that I am on one of my hobby-horses. I honestly don't care what method (grammar-translation, direct, audio-lingual, communicative, etc) a teacher uses, so long as the learner is enabled to communicate in English. I believe passionately that teachers, however they enable learning, must, in order to be able to do this, have a clear understanding themselves of the grammar of English and of the way in which native speakers actually produce the sounds of English.

    Time to stop, I'm getting warm.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  8. #18
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    konungursvia is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: I need some answeres to be fluent at British accent !

    Oh, 5jj, was that Eton, or Harrow?

  9. #19
    5jj's Avatar
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    Default Re: I need some answeres to be fluent at British accent !

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    Oh, 5jj, was that Eton, or Harrow?
    In BrE, preparatory schools are for pupils aged eight to eleven or thirteen. Eton and Harrow are public schools, which in England and Wales are independent, fee-paying schools, unlike the public schools of the United States and Canada, which provide free education funded by the state. These are known in England and Wales as state schools.
    Please do not edit your question after it has received a response. Such editing can make the response hard for others to understand.


  10. #20
    billmcd is offline Key Member
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    Default Re: I need some answeres to be fluent at British accent !

    Quote Originally Posted by konungursvia View Post
    English has been in Britain for a very long time, so there are hundreds of accents there, and no single "British Pronunciation."
    I would add that there is a significant difference between accent and pronunciation. And further that pronunciation is more important. I am a believer that one should be proud of their heritage, and accent is a part of that characteristic.

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