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    #1

    Smile at used when we think of a place as a point

    Hello everybody,

    I hope that all of you spent Easter full of fun and filled with joy.

    In English tutorials, 'at' is said to be used when we think of a place or position as a point rather than an area:
    e.g. at the window, at the table, at the door, at the next traffic light,etc.
    Does this only apply to certain words?


    Could I also say

    1) I am standing at my father's car. (Meaning close to or by my father's car)

    2) I am standing at the chair my mother bought yesterday. (Meaning close to or by the chair my mother bought yesterday)

    3) Let's meet at the oak tree in front of the town hall at two. (Meaning close to or by the oak tree in front of the town hall)

    4) My friends and I had a nice barbecue at the bridge on the riverbanks. (Meaning near by the bridge on the riverbanks)

    considering these places or positions in these examples a point?

    Greetings from the Alpine region

    Joern
    Last edited by Joern Matthias; 02-Apr-2013 at 16:02.

  1. BobK's Avatar
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    #2

    Re: at used when we think of a place as a point

    Quote Originally Posted by Joern Matthias View Post
    ...
    In English tutorials, 'at' is said to be used when we think of a place or position as a point rather than an area:
    e.g. at the window, at the table, at the door, at the next traffic light,etc.
    Does this only apply to certain words?


    Could I also say

    1) I am standing at my father's car. (Meaning close to or by my father's car)

    2) I am standing at the chair my mother bought yesterday. (Meaning close to or by the chair my mother bought yesterday)

    3) Let's meet at the oak tree in front of the town hall at two. (Meaning close to or by the oak tree in front of the town hall)

    4) My friends and I had a nice barbecue at the bridge on the riverbanks. (Meaning near by the bridge on the riverbanks)

    considering these places or positions in these examples a point?

    ...
    I had not met this rule until now, but it seems to work best with things that are upright - 'at the tree', 'at the bus-stop', 'at the lamp-post'... as well as simple geographical things like at the corner or 'at the staion'.

    b

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